Tags: Greg Kroah-Hartman

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open source summit
Greg Kroah-Hartman talks about the importance of community interaction and the upcoming Open Source Summit.

Greg Kroah-Hartman on Linux, Security, and Making Connections at Open Source Summit

People might not think about the Linux kernel all that much when talking about containers, serverless, and other hot technologies, but none of them would be possible without Linux as a solid base to build on, says Greg Kroah-Hartman.  He should know. Kroah-Hartman maintains the stable branch of the...
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Meltdown and Spectre Linux Kernel Status

If your Linux systems are running a normal Linux distribution, go update your kernel. They should all have the updates in them already. And then keep updating them over the next few weeks, we are still working out lots of corner case bugs given that the testing involved here is complex given the...
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Linux Kernel Development Cycle

The kernel development cycle has evolved so beautifully overtime that it has set an example in the open source world. Having contributed to the kernel I actually enjoyed learning about the whole development cycle. Terms like mainline kernel, rc, stable release, long-term support confused me a lot...
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Greg Kroah-Hartman: The Commander-in-Chief of the Linux Stable Branch

In the sometimes-contentious Linux Kernel developer community, the gentle giant of a man Greg Kroah-Hartman is the friendliest face. When you plug a device into a Linux system and it works out of the box, the credit goes to Kroah-Hartman. He travels around the globe, talking to hardware vendors to...
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Linux Kernel 4.8 Reaches End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.9 Series

After informing us about the availability of the Linux 4.8.16 kernel update a few days ago, Greg Kroah-Hartman announced earlier today the availability of a new maintenance update, which appears to be the last in the stable series. It was bound to happen sooner or later, especially now that the...
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Greg Kroah-Hartman
"We’re in it for the long haul. We don’t just want an instant code dump -- we want them to become part of our community," said Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman at the recent Embedded Linux Conference.

Fireside Chat: GKH Talks Licensing, Email, and Aging Maintainers

No one aside from Linus Torvalds has more influence or name recognition in the Linux Kernel project than Greg Kroah-Hartman. More commonly known as GKH, the ex SUSE kernel developer and USB driver maintainer is now a Linux Foundation Fellow and the full-time maintainer of the -stable Linux branch...
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Linux Kernel 3.14 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.4 LTS

We reported the other day that the long-term supported Linux 3.14 kernel branch is about to reach end of life, and that one more maintenance version would be released in the next couple of weeks. Well, it looks like the Linux kernel maintainers have decided that there's no need to maintain the...
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It's Time to Say Goodbye to Linux 4.6

'Please move to 4.7.1 now,' the kernel's lead maintainer says. If you're using a version of Linux based on the 4.6 series of the kernel, the software's lead maintainer has a message for you: It's time to upgrade. Greg Kroah-Hartman on Tuesday announced the arrival of Linux 4.6.7 and made it clear...
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Greg Kroah-Hartman
Greg Kroah-Hartman provides an overview of Linux kernel maintenance and development to the Kubernetes team.

Greg Kroah-Hartman Tells Google's Kubernetes Team How to Go Faster

What has 21 million lines of code, 4000 contributors, and more changes per day than most software projects have in months, or even years? The Linux kernel, of course. In this video, Greg Kroah-Hartman provides an inside view of how the largest, fastest software project of all absorbs so many...
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How Linux Kernel Development Impacts Security

At CoreOS Fest, Greg Kroah-Hartman, maintainer of the Linux kernel, declares that almost all bugs can be security issues. The Linux kernel is a fast moving project, and it's important for both users and developers to quickly update to new releases to remain up-to-date and secure. That was the...
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