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Istimsak Abdulbasir

Istimsak Abdulbasir

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  • Member Since: 05 Jan 10
  • Last Logged In: 21 Jul

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  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: I have questions about Linux before I install it as my OS
    willytheworm highlighted some pros and cons about linux and windows. Keep in mind. No OS, is immune to cracks. It is simply a matter of will-power. The reason you don't hear linux being readily cracked is because it is not generally used on the desktop and its security management system is more solid than windows. Honestly, I prefer to use Linux when browsing the Internet. Did you have a password set on your Windows box? Seemed very easy for the violators to gain access to your system. Do a little research and investigate all the programs you have on your system. If you want to solidify security, learn system and network security. Be very proactive when securing your system.
    Link to this post 21 Jul

    willytheworm highlighted some pros and cons about linux and windows. Keep in mind. No OS, is immune to cracks. It is simply a matter of will-power. The reason you don't hear linux being readily cracked is because it is not generally used on the desktop and its security management system is more solid than windows.

    Honestly, I prefer to use Linux when browsing the Internet. Did you have a password set on your Windows box? Seemed very easy for the violators to gain access to your system. Do a little research and investigate all the programs you have on your system. If you want to solidify security, learn system and network security. Be very proactive when securing your system.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Linux for a webdesigner
    [quote="arochester"]http://alternativeto.net/software/adobe-illustrator/?platform=linux http://alternativeto.net/software/adobe-photoshop/?platform=linux There are many Gimp tutorials e.g. http://www.gimp.org/tutorials/ http://www.gimpology.com/ http://www.gimptalk.com/index.php?/topic/34102-beginning-with-gimp-starting-tutorial-for-new-users/ http://www.gimpology.com/ You can Google more.[/quote] Thanks for posting these links. I am not a graphics designer or web developer. I can draw, or sketch designs. What I found here is pretty impressive.
    Link to this post 21 Jul

    Thanks for posting these links. I am not a graphics designer or web developer. I can draw, or sketch designs. What I found here is pretty impressive.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Noob deciding about Linux
    [quote="zanthal"]I've been using Windows for every PC I've ever owned for over 20 years. So my questions are going to be from the "what the huh?" perspective on Linux and Ubuntu -- First, I need confirmation about the rumors I've collected: I've heard that Ubuntu is very stable and has good support. I know it is free, that much I'm certain of. I've heard that using WINE, you can run any Windows-based software. -- Now I used MS-DOS before Windows, so I'm familiar with the MS-DOS command line. And I've used a tiny bit of Unix, just enough to know that it uses a whole other set of commands to do similar things as MS-DOS. Now, the general summary of the hundreds of questions I could come up with is this: How steep is the learning curve if someone who is very familiar with Windows, tried to switch entirely over to Linux, probably using what appears to me to be the best supported and stable Linux OS, Ubuntu? How secure is it compared to say, Windows 7? Are there any obvious advantages or disadvantages to using Linux over Windows (that are less than obvious to me)? What can someone accomplish with Linux/Ubuntu that is any better than one could accomplish with Windows? Are there any hardware compatibility issues with Linux/Ubuntu? How effective is WINE at running Windows software? This question is going to effect my decision a lot. Feel free to add anything, link for me any web resources that would good to have ... and thank you for taking a moment to help me understand. [/quote] I just want to add a few things. Ubuntu for the most part is stable and has good support. It is backed by committed developers and a large community. It works as intended. The LTSes are the most stable. However, that does not mean, it does not experience errors every now and then. It is not error proof. For the time I have been using it, there has been times where I had to research heavily to fix an error. Make sure you are specific in what you mean by "stable". It is stable in terms of system functions? Yes, it rarely breaks. Is it stable on hardware? Yes, if you use what is supported. Is it stable with all open source programs? No. Some open sources programs can make the system very unstable or just don't work well. Wine is not a go-to for Windows programs. Even with the programs tested to work with it, it still falls short of "good enough". You are better off using open source equivalents to MS programs. Sometimes you can get lucky but it is not reliable. Ubuntu or any Linux OS is "NOT" a replacement for windows. It is an open OS. Meaning, it is designed to let the "user" decide what "they" want. You use linux because of a special need not to replace something else. Every OS has a specific function. You must find the function that suites you. Ubuntu is good for a Linux-based desktop if you want to use Linux as a desktop OS. Make sure you know what you are trying to accomplish.
    Link to this post 21 Jul

    zanthal said:

    I've been using Windows for every PC I've ever owned for over 20 years.

    So my questions are going to be from the "what the huh?" perspective on Linux and Ubuntu


    --
    First, I need confirmation about the rumors I've collected:

    I've heard that Ubuntu is very stable and has good support. I know it is free, that much I'm certain of.

    I've heard that using WINE, you can run any Windows-based software.
    --


    Now I used MS-DOS before Windows, so I'm familiar with the MS-DOS command line. And I've used a tiny bit of Unix, just enough to know that it uses a whole other set of commands to do similar things as MS-DOS.

    Now, the general summary of the hundreds of questions I could come up with is this:

    How steep is the learning curve if someone who is very familiar with Windows, tried to switch entirely over to Linux, probably using what appears to me to be the best supported and stable Linux OS, Ubuntu?

    How secure is it compared to say, Windows 7?

    Are there any obvious advantages or disadvantages to using Linux over Windows (that are less than obvious to me)?

    What can someone accomplish with Linux/Ubuntu that is any better than one could accomplish with Windows?

    Are there any hardware compatibility issues with Linux/Ubuntu?

    How effective is WINE at running Windows software? This question is going to effect my decision a lot.




    Feel free to add anything, link for me any web resources that would good to have ... and thank you for taking a moment to help me understand.

    I just want to add a few things.

    Ubuntu for the most part is stable and has good support. It is backed by committed developers and a large community. It works as intended. The LTSes are the most stable. However, that does not mean, it does not experience errors every now and then. It is not error proof. For the time I have been using it, there has been times where I had to research heavily to fix an error. Make sure you are specific in what you mean by "stable". It is stable in terms of system functions? Yes, it rarely breaks. Is it stable on hardware? Yes, if you use what is supported. Is it stable with all open source programs? No. Some open sources programs can make the system very unstable or just don't work well.

    Wine is not a go-to for Windows programs. Even with the programs tested to work with it, it still falls short of "good enough". You are better off using open source equivalents to MS programs. Sometimes you can get lucky but it is not reliable.

    Ubuntu or any Linux OS is "NOT" a replacement for windows. It is an open OS. Meaning, it is designed to let the "user" decide what "they" want. You use linux because of a special need not to replace something else. Every OS has a specific function. You must find the function that suites you.

    Ubuntu is good for a Linux-based desktop if you want to use Linux as a desktop OS. Make sure you know what you are trying to accomplish.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: How can check/test serial port working in my target board and How can configure node in kernel for s
    [quote="JayminD"] I want to know that how and where can I find serial driver file (i.e. for /ttyS*) in my kernel image in Linux.... ??? and How can I check/test the serial driver on my ARM dev. board ?? (mean how can I test that driver and serial port is working properly ?? ) can you just suggest me or tell me that how can I check my serial port on my ARM target board that is working correctly and how can I configure serial post ??? I mean that , as we configure fb0 for LVDS LCD and configure it and send any image on it that's same how can I check my serial port and check it that whether its working correctly or not ?? How can I activate it's node in my board ?? Please reply me ASAP I need help urgent, b'coz it's very imp for me so.. Thanks a lot. Best Regards Jaymin D [/quote] Interesting question you asked. I don't know how to activate a serial port other then enabling the driver if one is included in the kernel or manually install the driver. The best way to test if a device is working is to confirm the kernel detects it. The most widely used method is lspci. In a terminal: #sudo lspci This lists all the devices on your system, with name, location, extensions and drivers. Read this article to get a better understanding of kernel modules. https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/kernel_modules Bestly, just connect something to the serial port and see if it gets read.
    Link to this post 12 Jul

    JayminD said:



    I want to know that how and where can I find serial driver file (i.e. for /ttyS*) in my kernel image in Linux.... ???

    and

    How can I check/test the serial driver on my ARM dev. board ?? (mean how can I test that driver and serial port is working properly ?? )

    can you just suggest me or tell me that how can I check my serial port on my ARM target board that is working correctly and how can I configure serial post ???

    I mean that , as we configure fb0 for LVDS LCD and configure it and send any image on it that's same how can I check my serial port and check it that whether its working correctly or not ??

    How can I activate it's node in my board ??

    Please reply me ASAP I need help urgent, b'coz it's very imp for me so..

    Thanks a lot.

    Best Regards

    Jaymin D

    Interesting question you asked. I don't know how to activate a serial port other then enabling the driver if one is included in the kernel or manually install the driver. The best way to test if a device is working is to confirm the kernel detects it. The most widely used method is lspci.

    In a terminal:
    #sudo lspci

    This lists all the devices on your system, with name, location, extensions and drivers.

    Read this article to get a better understanding of kernel modules.

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/kernel_modules

    Bestly, just connect something to the serial port and see if it gets read.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Lexmark Pro901
    On this site, it directed me to to the link on my last post. When looking at the list of supported OSes, it said to visit the site www.lexmark.com for drivers that work on a linux system. http://www.lexmark.com/US/en/catalog/product.jsp?prodId=6054
    Link to this post 10 Jul

    On this site, it directed me to to the link on my last post. When looking at the list of supported OSes, it said to visit the site www.lexmark.com for drivers that work on a linux system.

    http://www.lexmark.com/US/en/catalog/product.jsp?prodId=6054

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Lexmark Pro901
    What is linux 06 OS? I looked at a site the Lexmark suggested I go to download drivers for a Lexmark pro901 printer. I added filters for type of Linux OS and version. You are using Ubuntu 12.04. This is the link to all drivers that are designed to work lexmark pro901 on ubuntu 12.04. Make sure you install them all and on the right architect. Use 32bit drivers for a 32bit system. http://support.lexmark.com/index?locale=EN&page=product&userlocale=EN_US&productCode=LEXMARK_PINNACLE_PRO901#2
    Link to this post 10 Jul

    What is linux 06 OS?

    I looked at a site the Lexmark suggested I go to download drivers for a Lexmark pro901 printer. I added filters for type of Linux OS and version. You are using Ubuntu 12.04. This is the link to all drivers that are designed to work lexmark pro901 on ubuntu 12.04. Make sure you install them all and on the right architect. Use 32bit drivers for a 32bit system.

    http://support.lexmark.com/index?locale=EN&page=product&userlocale=EN_US&productCode=LEXMARK_PINNACLE_PRO901#2

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: How to copy files from VM to host machine ?
    [quote="begueradj"]Howdy How can copy a file from my virtual machine to my host machine ? Thank you in advance for any answer. Begueradj[/quote] You will have to install the guest add-ons to allow for copying files between the VM and the host if you are using Virtualbox. Or, you can just send yourself an email :-). What VM hypervisor are you using.
    Link to this post 10 Jul

    begueradj said:

    Howdy

    How can copy a file from my virtual machine to my host machine ?

    Thank you in advance for any answer.
    Begueradj

    You will have to install the guest add-ons to allow for copying files between the VM and the host if you are using Virtualbox. Or, you can just send yourself an email :-). What VM hypervisor are you using.

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: changing mac adress very hard!help
    [quote="mondrago2"]hello guys, ok so ive spend cople of houers, neh allmost all day trying to change my macadress manually, im using a wifi hp probook 6560b. ok so this is what ive tryed. sudo su=xxxx sudo ifconfig wlan0 down. sudo ifconfig wlan0 hw ether 11.22.33.44.55.66 sudo ifconfig wlan0 up . ifconfig now this have changed to 11.22.33.44.55.66. when i reconect its the old hw adress agen, even ive delete the old internet conection for the ruter. now ive ben trying to go into the /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules and its the old adress, and when i then change the adress there agen to 11.22.33.44.55.66 i get this message active conection failed, so then i restarted my computer. then i go to terminal ifconfig and yeay! now we got the new conection! the wlan1 actually witch have ben added with the same old fantastic adress. so i looked up /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules agen, and there where added the wlan1, so something must have ben asked the device: is this your hw adress? no its........ ah okey il make a wlan1 with that adress. so i tryed to maby find the file that ask for the adress and maby say this is the dault, but turnd up its really hard when you dont know how to program, or even know how linux where buildt up, this will probably take years, so i thought that, why not ask the community, so here i am, so any one have any idea's? linux 14.04 LTS[/quote] There are sources of information that outline procedures for changing a MAC address in linux. To permenantly do it in Ubuntu, you much change the interface text file, /etc/network/interfaces. Here another link to add to the one above. [url=http://www.namhuy.net/1890/how-to-change-mac-address-on-ubuntu.html]Changing your mac address in ubuntu[/url]
    Link to this post 10 Jul

    mondrago2 said:

    hello guys, ok so ive spend cople of houers, neh allmost all day trying to change my macadress manually, im using a wifi hp probook 6560b.

    ok so this is what ive tryed.

    sudo su=xxxx
    sudo ifconfig wlan0 down.
    sudo ifconfig wlan0 hw ether 11.22.33.44.55.66
    sudo ifconfig wlan0 up
    .
    ifconfig
    now this have changed to 11.22.33.44.55.66.

    when i reconect its the old hw adress agen, even ive delete the old internet conection for the ruter.

    now ive ben trying to go into the /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules and its the old adress, and when i then change the adress there agen to 11.22.33.44.55.66 i get this message active conection failed, so then i restarted my computer.

    then i go to terminal ifconfig and yeay! now we got the new conection! the wlan1 actually witch have ben added with the same old fantastic adress.

    so i looked up /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules agen, and there where added the wlan1,

    so something must have ben asked the device: is this your hw adress? no its........
    ah okey il make a wlan1 with that adress.

    so i tryed to maby find the file that ask for the adress and maby say this is the dault, but turnd up its really hard when you dont know how to program, or even know how linux where buildt up, this will probably take years, so i thought that, why not ask the community, so here i am, so any one have any idea's? linux 14.04 LTS

    There are sources of information that outline procedures for changing a MAC address in linux. To permenantly do it in Ubuntu, you much change the interface text file, /etc/network/interfaces.

    Here another link to add to the one above.

    Changing your mac address in ubuntu

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Tried Ubuntu, seemed limited
    If you are still having sound issues, install pulse audio. Could you manually add the VST?
    Link to this post 10 Jul

    If you are still having sound issues, install pulse audio.

    Could you manually add the VST?

  • Istimsak Abdulbasir
    RE: Tried Ubuntu, seemed limited
    [quote="sysWOW94"]Hi all, new guy here. Well, a bit ago I tried Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on my computer. It was nice - didn't seem as fast as Windows 8.1 - but I liked it. My problem with it was that it seemed kind of underdone - I'm going to lay out a couple problems here, one minor annoyance, and one major issue, and my question is going to be whether this is just Ubuntu's fault, and some other distro would work better, or is this all of Linux. First, the minor irritant: The sound system setting wouldn't save. I had my headphones selected as audio output, and that setting kept getting lost, so that the audio would route to some sort of default device and I wouldn't hear it. It bothered me that the system couldn't seem to save such a simple setting. But here's what really made me drop Ubuntu: A piece of software that's very important to me failed on it, whereas it works fine under windows. That software is Linux MultiMedia Studio (LMMS). I make electronic music on my computer, and I had two VSTs (plugins for the program - they're software instruments) fail under Linux whereas they work great under Windows. VSTs are coded as .DLL files for everyone's information. One of them simply froze the program and never unfroze, and the other lagged the sound down to the point where it sounded awful. They both work without a hitch under Windows (in fairness, the one that froze the program does that once in a *LONG* while under Windows). I use that program for my music creation all the time, and I didn't want to have to switch back to Windows constantly for it, so I got rid of Ubuntu. My question is, again, would a different distro be different, or is this just an unavoidable Linux problem? The impression I got was that Linux (at least Ubuntu) is great as long as you don't want to step outside the boundaries of the stuff the developers thought of for you to do. If you do want to do that, then suddenly, everything goes to hell. Thanks, -syswow94[/quote] First thanks for joining the forum. Linux is a system that does let people stand outside the box. In Linux you are limited to what works for linux. Programs that are ran under Windows should continue to the use that system. There are other open source programs like "wine" that try to run windows applications. Not reliable. You are using the tar zip file of LMMS version 1.0.2 for linux right? I don't like to compile packages on Ubuntu. Though it can be done, it is not very easy. You are better off using the supplied software in the repositories. Ubuntu was made as a linux desktop for windows-like users. Very easy to use where little technical skills are needed. What flavor of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS are you using? Plus, do you know the name of the software that is used to control the sound? Make sure all your computer hardware is compatible with Ubuntu or Linux in general.
    Link to this post 07 Jul

    sysWOW94 said:

    Hi all, new guy here. Well, a bit ago I tried Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on my computer. It was nice - didn't seem as fast as Windows 8.1 - but I liked it. My problem with it was that it seemed kind of underdone - I'm going to lay out a couple problems here, one minor annoyance, and one major issue, and my question is going to be whether this is just Ubuntu's fault, and some other distro would work better, or is this all of Linux.

    First, the minor irritant: The sound system setting wouldn't save. I had my headphones selected as audio output, and that setting kept getting lost, so that the audio would route to some sort of default device and I wouldn't hear it. It bothered me that the system couldn't seem to save such a simple setting.

    But here's what really made me drop Ubuntu: A piece of software that's very important to me failed on it, whereas it works fine under windows. That software is Linux MultiMedia Studio (LMMS). I make electronic music on my computer, and I had two VSTs (plugins for the program - they're software instruments) fail under Linux whereas they work great under Windows. VSTs are coded as .DLL files for everyone's information.

    One of them simply froze the program and never unfroze, and the other lagged the sound down to the point where it sounded awful. They both work without a hitch under Windows (in fairness, the one that froze the program does that once in a *LONG* while under Windows).

    I use that program for my music creation all the time, and I didn't want to have to switch back to Windows constantly for it, so I got rid of Ubuntu. My question is, again, would a different distro be different, or is this just an unavoidable Linux problem?

    The impression I got was that Linux (at least Ubuntu) is great as long as you don't want to step outside the boundaries of the stuff the developers thought of for you to do. If you do want to do that, then suddenly, everything goes to hell.

    Thanks,
    -syswow94

    First thanks for joining the forum. Linux is a system that does let people stand outside the box. In Linux you are limited to what works for linux. Programs that are ran under Windows should continue to the use that system. There are other open source programs like "wine" that try to run windows applications. Not reliable.

    You are using the tar zip file of LMMS version 1.0.2 for linux right? I don't like to compile packages on Ubuntu. Though it can be done, it is not very easy. You are better off using the supplied software in the repositories. Ubuntu was made as a linux desktop for windows-like users. Very easy to use where little technical skills are needed.

    What flavor of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS are you using? Plus, do you know the name of the software that is used to control the sound? Make sure all your computer hardware is compatible with Ubuntu or Linux in general.

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