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masinick

masinick

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 20
  • Member Since: 13 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 01 Nov 12

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  • masinick
    RE: MEPIS-C Release 1
    Hmm, I do not see MEPIS-C in the location mentioned. Can it be found elsewhere?
    Link to this post 29 Sep 09

    Hmm, I do not see MEPIS-C in the location mentioned. Can it be found elsewhere?

  • masinick
    RE: MEPIS-C Release 1
    I am going to have to give MEPIS-C a spin, since I am a big MEPIS and antiX fan, and I have had VERY GOOD results with many of the derivatives and respins that I have tried so far. Thanks for posting about it here; I managed to overlook it somehow until now; I aim to correct that!
    Link to this post 29 Sep 09

    I am going to have to give MEPIS-C a spin, since I am a big MEPIS and antiX fan, and I have had VERY GOOD results with many of the derivatives and respins that I have tried so far. Thanks for posting about it here; I managed to overlook it somehow until now; I aim to correct that!

  • masinick
    RE: Why do you love Debian?
    [b]geophoenix wrote:[/b] [quote] But the distribution that i only tried once and never again remove it from my desktop was and is Debian GNU/Linux .. [/quote] I think you cornered many of the reasons why Debian lovers take it and stick with it. Once you install it, you really never need to install it again, simply upgrade it, add and remove software as needed. You cited a great number of the other reasons that people stick with it. In spite of the reputation otherwise, it is extremely easy to manage and it works. Debian Stable makes an outstanding server platform. But it can be used for a lot more than just a server. Desktop users often opt for Debian Testing or Debian Sid because you can get newer software, but then you get a somewhat more volatile environment. I use a Debian Sid based distribution that greatly helps me manage that volatility, which results in allowing me to have a cutting edge desktop, laptop, or portable system that also "just works". The distribution that I use is called sidux - and they recently added a group here, so if you poke around, you can find out more about sidux - or look at sidux.com.
    Link to this post 04 Jun 09

    geophoenix wrote:


    But the distribution that i only tried once and never again remove it from my desktop was and is Debian GNU/Linux ..

    I think you cornered many of the reasons why Debian lovers take it and stick with it. Once you install it, you really never need to install it again, simply upgrade it, add and remove software as needed. You cited a great number of the other reasons that people stick with it. In spite of the reputation otherwise, it is extremely easy to manage and it works.

    Debian Stable makes an outstanding server platform. But it can be used for a lot more than just a server. Desktop users often opt for Debian Testing or Debian Sid because you can get newer software, but then you get a somewhat more volatile environment.

    I use a Debian Sid based distribution that greatly helps me manage that volatility, which results in allowing me to have a cutting edge desktop, laptop, or portable system that also "just works". The distribution that I use is called sidux - and they recently added a group here, so if you poke around, you can find out more about sidux - or look at sidux.com.

  • masinick
    sidux is an AWESOME distribution!
    I love Debian distributions, including the original Debian Stable, Testing, and Unstable (Sid) distributions. I have at least two Debian Lenny instances on my computers. But I really love Debian derived distributions, sometimes even more than Debian itself. Three of them that really stand out for me fit neatly into three niches and with these three distributions I could (if I did not love testing distros so much) do all of my computing with them. 1. I love sidux because it gives me a fast, cutting edge Debian Sid based system that works really well, and in two years of use, has yet to fail me. I can actually use it as an every day system and it comes through with great performance and features. 2. I love SimplyMEPIS because it really is simple. It is also stable, clean, and reasonably fast. Warren Woodford, the SimplyMEPIS founder, does such a good job with his software that even his test releases are superior to many other released distributions. 3. AntiX, based on SimplyMEPIS, is nearly as solid and stable as SimplyMEPIS, but it uses Debian Testing by default (which you can change to Stable or Sid). It is fast and lean, but it is also flexible. It is a curious and awesome blend of SimplyMEPIS and sidux - it has tools from both of them, so you can imagine, since I like each of them so well, that I am also extremely fond of antiX!
    Link to this post 02 Jun 09

    I love Debian distributions, including the original Debian Stable, Testing, and Unstable (Sid) distributions. I have at least two Debian Lenny instances on my computers. But I really love Debian derived distributions, sometimes even more than Debian itself. Three of them that really stand out for me fit neatly into three niches and with these three distributions I could (if I did not love testing distros so much) do all of my computing with them.

    1. I love sidux because it gives me a fast, cutting edge Debian Sid based system that works really well, and in two years of use, has yet to fail me. I can actually use it as an every day system and it comes through with great performance and features.

    2. I love SimplyMEPIS because it really is simple. It is also stable, clean, and reasonably fast. Warren Woodford, the SimplyMEPIS founder, does such a good job with his software that even his test releases are superior to many other released distributions.

    3. AntiX, based on SimplyMEPIS, is nearly as solid and stable as SimplyMEPIS, but it uses Debian Testing by default (which you can change to Stable or Sid). It is fast and lean, but it is also flexible. It is a curious and awesome blend of SimplyMEPIS and sidux - it has tools from both of them, so you can imagine, since I like each of them so well, that I am also extremely fond of antiX!

  • masinick
    RE: No Posts Yet?
    Yeah, Jerry Bond WOULD be enthusiastic about SimplyMEPIS - he is one of the primary community contributors when it comes to coordinating the documentation, and he is an outstanding example of what makes the MEPIS community work so well! I participate there, too, but not with anywhere near the regularity or responsibility that Jerry so freely gives. Every SimplyMEPIS release is excellent. It is rare when even a test build fails to run well. Personally, I have been a MEPIS user dating back to May 2003 when I found the first public release that Warren Woodford made available. I am also a great fan of one of the lightweight community versions, antiX, and I try to help test and promote both SimplyMEPIS and antiX. If you need a lightweight distribution with good hardware detection and configuration, antiX is awesome. SimplyMEPIS is great in a similar way as a simple, very stable desktop system. These are two of my favorite distributions.
    Link to this post 02 Jun 09

    Yeah, Jerry Bond WOULD be enthusiastic about SimplyMEPIS - he is one of the primary community contributors when it comes to coordinating the documentation, and he is an outstanding example of what makes the MEPIS community work so well!

    I participate there, too, but not with anywhere near the regularity or responsibility that Jerry so freely gives.

    Every SimplyMEPIS release is excellent. It is rare when even a test build fails to run well. Personally, I have been a MEPIS user dating back to May 2003 when I found the first public release that Warren Woodford made available.

    I am also a great fan of one of the lightweight community versions, antiX, and I try to help test and promote both SimplyMEPIS and antiX. If you need a lightweight distribution with good hardware detection and configuration, antiX is awesome. SimplyMEPIS is great in a similar way as a simple, very stable desktop system. These are two of my favorite distributions.

  • masinick
    RE: Desktop Environments
    I use a wide variety of desktop and window managers, though I have never used XMonad, nor have I, to my knowledge, used any tools or applications written in Haskell, though I have at least heard of it. I've been using UNIX systems since before the X Window System was even available (1982), and I used some of the very early Xlib implementations of X, the Motif implementation when it first came out, and fvwm when I first started using Linux based systems. Therefore, window and desktop managers that have some common traits with these environments tend to be the ones that I am the most familiar with. I use KDE and XFCE about 50/50, and the two of them probably comprise nearly 90% of my desktop use. The remaining 10% I split between a variety of desktop and window managers. When I use a window manager, I probably use IceWM the most, followed by fvwm-crystal. I use most of the major desktop and window managers at least a little bit, if for no other reason than to try them out. GNOME is way better than it used to be; years ago I did not care much for it; these days I use other environments mostly because of time spent and familiarity with them.
    Link to this post 02 Jun 09

    I use a wide variety of desktop and window managers, though I have never used XMonad, nor have I, to my knowledge, used any tools or applications written in Haskell, though I have at least heard of it.

    I've been using UNIX systems since before the X Window System was even available (1982), and I used some of the very early Xlib implementations of X, the Motif implementation when it first came out, and fvwm when I first started using Linux based systems. Therefore, window and desktop managers that have some common traits with these environments tend to be the ones that I am the most familiar with.

    I use KDE and XFCE about 50/50, and the two of them probably comprise nearly 90% of my desktop use. The remaining 10% I split between a variety of desktop and window managers. When I use a window manager, I probably use IceWM the most, followed by fvwm-crystal.

    I use most of the major desktop and window managers at least a little bit, if for no other reason than to try them out. GNOME is way better than it used to be; years ago I did not care much for it; these days I use other environments mostly because of time spent and familiarity with them.

  • masinick
    RE: Need some good distro ideas
    As long as you are command line savvy, you can install most any system, because it seems that you have enough disk space, if 40 GB is really accessible. A full desktop environment, such as KDE or GNOME, if it runs at all, will be so slow that it will be non-functional. A moderate desktop, such as XFCE, may run, but it is not likely to do well either. You may have a chance getting LXDE or Enlightenment to work, those are about the "heaviest" environments likely to work with so little memory and processor capability. But any distribution that offers fvwm, IceWM, JWM, Openbox, or Fluxbox ought to work well enough to give you a window manager display environment. That would include any Debian derived system that uses Debian repositories, that would likely include a Ubuntu based system, adding in one or more of those window managers, that would include Crunch Bang #! Linux, which IS a Ubuntu derivative. Absolute Linux, Vector Linux, and Slackware would be possibilities, again as long as you replace any heavy default desktop with one of the five or so lightweight window manager environments. Any other distribution where it either comes equipped that way or you can download such environments, would also work with a modest amount of research and work on your part. I like antiX; you may be able to get that one to work great right from the installation.
    Link to this post 02 Jun 09

    As long as you are command line savvy, you can install most any system, because it seems that you have enough disk space, if 40 GB is really accessible. A full desktop environment, such as KDE or GNOME, if it runs at all, will be so slow that it will be non-functional. A moderate desktop, such as XFCE, may run, but it is not likely to do well either. You may have a chance getting LXDE or Enlightenment to work, those are about the "heaviest" environments likely to work with so little memory and processor capability. But any distribution that offers fvwm, IceWM, JWM, Openbox, or Fluxbox ought to work well enough to give you a window manager display environment. That would include any Debian derived system that uses Debian repositories, that would likely include a Ubuntu based system, adding in one or more of those window managers, that would include Crunch Bang #! Linux, which IS a Ubuntu derivative.

    Absolute Linux, Vector Linux, and Slackware would be possibilities, again as long as you replace any heavy default desktop with one of the five or so lightweight window manager environments. Any other distribution where it either comes equipped that way or you can download such environments, would also work with a modest amount of research and work on your part.

    I like antiX; you may be able to get that one to work great right from the installation.

  • masinick
    RE: Why do you love Debian?
    Naturally, I use Debian and all these derivatives because they just work, and they work exceedingly well. Oh yes, the aspect of a rolling upgrade with Debian Sid derivatives is a compelling feature too!
    Link to this post 25 May 09

    Naturally, I use Debian and all these derivatives because they just work, and they work exceedingly well.

    Oh yes, the aspect of a rolling upgrade with Debian Sid derivatives is a compelling feature too!

  • masinick
    RE: Why do you love Debian?
    Debian contains the core packaging and software for a choice of a rock stable and secure OS - great for a server (Debian Stable, currently Lenny), a great testing distribution that has already been through Debian Sid, and is thus a very stable desktop system, or the cutting edge, Debian Sid. From these three core packaging trees, you can either run plain Debian or you can use any one of a great number of systems that have been derived from Debian. For me personally, SimplyMEPIS is an excellent system derived from Debian Stable, and I keep it around so I always have a stable desktop system on hand. Then I also grab another MEPIS offshoot, antiX, which provides me with a Debian Testing distro (but antiX can be used with Stable, Testing, or Sid). Finally, I have a Debian Sid desktop system that is tamed called sidux, which I think is the most usable cutting edge system around. Of course, I keep at least one or two REAL Debian systems around that are not derivatives, but are the real thing. I have a Debian Lenny system on two of my laptops right now as well, plus lots of other Debian derivatives.
    Link to this post 25 May 09

    Debian contains the core packaging and software for a choice of a rock stable and secure OS - great for a server (Debian Stable, currently Lenny), a great testing distribution that has already been through Debian Sid, and is thus a very stable desktop system, or the cutting edge, Debian Sid.

    From these three core packaging trees, you can either run plain Debian or you can use any one of a great number of systems that have been derived from Debian. For me personally, SimplyMEPIS is an excellent system derived from Debian Stable, and I keep it around so I always have a stable desktop system on hand. Then I also grab another MEPIS offshoot, antiX, which provides me with a Debian Testing distro (but antiX can be used with Stable, Testing, or Sid). Finally, I have a Debian Sid desktop system that is tamed called sidux, which I think is the most usable cutting edge system around.

    Of course, I keep at least one or two REAL Debian systems around that are not derivatives, but are the real thing. I have a Debian Lenny system on two of my laptops right now as well, plus lots of other Debian derivatives.

  • masinick
    RE: Ubuntu Intrepid Stack up
    If you cannot get to the console, you may have to boot/reboot, then don't pause, look there right away. dmesg usually only has the current session, but most logs have 3-4 versions, so you can look back to previous logs to see what has been going on. In the worst case, add a S to the boot command line and boot Single User, then you can get to /var/log to examine it.
    Link to this post 25 May 09

    If you cannot get to the console, you may have to boot/reboot, then don't pause, look there right away.

    dmesg usually only has the current session, but most logs have 3-4 versions, so you can look back to previous logs to see what has been going on.

    In the worst case, add a S to the boot command line and boot Single User, then you can get to /var/log to examine it.

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