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GoinEasy9

GoinEasy9

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  • Posts: 1145
  • Member Since: 13 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 21 Aug

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  • GoinEasy9
    RE: Should I keep the same distribution or update to new one?
    I also run bleeding edge distros but, I've stopped upgrading as soon as a new version is released, preferring to get work done instead of constantly tinkering. It is really your decision.
    Link to this post 28 Apr 12


    I also run bleeding edge distros but, I've stopped upgrading as soon as a new version is released, preferring to get work done instead of constantly tinkering. It is really your decision.

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: yum connection error
    The reply link mark pointed you to dealt with yumfastest-mirror. When I get repo errors in Fedora I have just do: Yum clean all Then Yum update And it usually fixes the problem.
    Link to this post 28 Apr 12

    The reply link mark pointed you to dealt with yumfastest-mirror. When I get repo errors in Fedora I have just do:

    Yum clean all
    Then
    Yum update

    And it usually fixes the problem.

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: KDE China User: A KDE Meeting in Beijing
    I'm a KDE user myself, thanks for the post.
    Link to this post 21 Apr 12

    I'm a KDE user myself, thanks for the post.

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: What's the difference between:Gnome +Mate / LXDE / KDE?
    Since you mentioned Boot Camp, I'm assuming you're using a MAC. In some cases installing Linux on a MAC is troublesome, but not always. I would advise going to the forums of the distro that you've chosen to install, and search for the model MAC you have and see if there are any problems or tricks that were used to successfully install (or just Google the info). If I'm wrong about you having a MAC, then .... nevermind. :D If your choosing whether to use a 32 or 64 bit version of Linux, the choice is up to you, as long as your CPU is a 64 bit processor. To this day, I still use 32 bit on all my installs. The one I'm using right now is an AMD Phenom X4 and I know it sounds like blasphemy to some, but, I still find it easier to maintain a 32 bit OS. The reason is that even though applications are compiled for 64 bit, many still were written for 32 bit, and, have to use 32 bit libraries. I still say that once all applications are written explicitly for 64 bit, then, I'll start using 64 bit. Many of my Linux friends would disagree, but, that's the choice I make. If you have a spare partition, and, are just testing, you can install one, experiment with it, then install the other and see if it makes a difference for you. The choice is yours. I am not restricted using any system resources by using 32 bit. BTW - I've never used a MAC or Boot Camp so I can't give you first hand knowledge. I only know that in the Fedora Forums, I see folks with MACs using the standard Fedora installer. I don't know what advantage or disadvantage using or not using Boot Camp will make. Keep us informed of your progress. Tom
    Link to this post 10 Apr 12

    Since you mentioned Boot Camp, I'm assuming you're using a MAC. In some cases installing Linux on a MAC is troublesome, but not always. I would advise going to the forums of the distro that you've chosen to install, and search for the model MAC you have and see if there are any problems or tricks that were used to successfully install (or just Google the info). If I'm wrong about you having a MAC, then .... nevermind. :D

    If your choosing whether to use a 32 or 64 bit version of Linux, the choice is up to you, as long as your CPU is a 64 bit processor. To this day, I still use 32 bit on all my installs. The one I'm using right now is an AMD Phenom X4 and I know it sounds like blasphemy to some, but, I still find it easier to maintain a 32 bit OS. The reason is that even though applications are compiled for 64 bit, many still were written for 32 bit, and, have to use 32 bit libraries. I still say that once all applications are written explicitly for 64 bit, then, I'll start using 64 bit. Many of my Linux friends would disagree, but, that's the choice I make. If you have a spare partition, and, are just testing, you can install one, experiment with it, then install the other and see if it makes a difference for you. The choice is yours. I am not restricted using any system resources by using 32 bit.

    BTW - I've never used a MAC or Boot Camp so I can't give you first hand knowledge. I only know that in the Fedora Forums, I see folks with MACs using the standard Fedora installer. I don't know what advantage or disadvantage using or not using Boot Camp will make.

    Keep us informed of your progress.

    Tom

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: Good to be back.
    As I said in another thread, welcome back, we missed you. Congratulations on getting your degree and good luck on your bachelors. It's a great field to be in these days, not much else has listings in the job market.
    Link to this post 09 Apr 12

    As I said in another thread, welcome back, we missed you. Congratulations on getting your degree and good luck on your bachelors. It's a great field to be in these days, not much else has listings in the job market.

  • GoinEasy9
    RE: [Resolved]DVI to HMDI Linux issue, Black Screen.[Resolved]
    I haven't had to use DVI to HDMI, my connections are all HDMI to HDMI, but, I had to go in to PulseAudio to change the settings for audio. When the HDMI was plugged in, PA still showed output to the default speakers and I had to change it to one of the HDMI settings. Take a look and see if the setting for both video and audio are pointed to the correct settings, although, I don't know if using the DVI port will restrict audio, and you might have to use a separate audio cable. BTW - Welcome back, we can use all the help we can get. Hope school and job are going well. Glad you made it further though, well, school and life, heh ... seems to get harder every year. Tom
    Link to this post 09 Apr 12

    I haven't had to use DVI to HDMI, my connections are all HDMI to HDMI, but, I had to go in to PulseAudio to change the settings for audio. When the HDMI was plugged in, PA still showed output to the default speakers and I had to change it to one of the HDMI settings. Take a look and see if the setting for both video and audio are pointed to the correct settings, although, I don't know if using the DVI port will restrict audio, and you might have to use a separate audio cable.

    BTW - Welcome back, we can use all the help we can get. Hope school and job are going well. Glad you made it further though, well, school and life, heh ... seems to get harder every year.

    Tom

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