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quaid

quaid

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 17
  • Member Since: 05 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 21 Jun 12

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  • quaid
    RE: What do you think of This Forum Software
    Regarding the usability of the software on the forum, it seems pretty good so far, with only a half-dozen posts under my belt. I did have one oddity where I quoted in parentheses, and it became an emoticon ("like this"). But the wysiwyg editor is pretty smooth and lightweight. I am now a big fan of web apps with a lot of typing in fields that implement autosave, such as Wordpress now has. That would be a good feature to add, especially since we are logged in already.
    Link to this post 14 May 09

    Regarding the usability of the software on the forum, it seems pretty good so far, with only a half-dozen posts under my belt.

    I did have one oddity where I quoted in parentheses, and it became an emoticon ("like this"). But the wysiwyg editor is pretty smooth and lightweight.

    I am now a big fan of web apps with a lot of typing in fields that implement autosave, such as Wordpress now has. That would be a good feature to add, especially since we are logged in already.

  • quaid
    RE: What do you think of This Forum Software
    +1 to returning old forum posts. A set of threaded and static HTML pages at the same URL or redirected to from the old location would be enough. It's about reading and learning from the past, with new discussions happening here.
    Link to this post 14 May 09

    +1 to returning old forum posts. A set of threaded and static HTML pages at the same URL or redirected to from the old location would be enough. It's about reading and learning from the past, with new discussions happening here.

  • quaid
    RE: RHEL or CentOS?
    Sometimes it comes down to simply how you feel about the control of your own future. Working directly with Red Hat puts you in an important position, a paying customer, with the people who are experts at getting problems fixed and new features included in upstream projects. Red Hat is the catalyst between you as a customer and many thousands of upstreams, not just the Linux kernel. Take a look at some of the past and ongoing contributions that have come from Red Hat, some of which were influenced by customer requests: [url]http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Red_Hat_contributions[/url] When you use a rebuild of Enterprise Linux, you gain the same benefits flowing downstream that Red Hat customers gain, but you change the dynamics of how you can manage your relationship with the upstream. Is your in-house support staff prepared to negotiate with upstream projects on your behalf? Work to get patches and features included in the code? If they are, that is great; the world needs more corporations that are contributing from within their own IT staff. Again, though, when doing that, having a partner, such as Red Hat, to work with on negotiating through the upstream maze can be helpful. People who work to produce Enterprise Linux rebuilds are in the same position with regard to how they can influence the upstream. If they are a paying customer, they can ask Red Hat for help. If not, they are welcome with everyone else to participate in the upstream project for RHEL, which also considers itself the upstream for CentOS, Scientific Linux, Whitebox Linux, and the myriad other rebuilds: [url]http://join.fedoraproject.org[/url] For a long view on how and why this works, I encourage you to take 9 mins and 21 seconds to watch Michael Tiemann talk about "The Open Source Triple Play": [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntzp8z14OXQ[/url] [url]http://www.redhat.com/magazine/001nov04/features/tripleplay/[/url]
    Link to this post 14 May 09

    Sometimes it comes down to simply how you feel about the control of your own future.

    Working directly with Red Hat puts you in an important position, a paying customer, with the people who are experts at getting problems fixed and new features included in upstream projects.

    Red Hat is the catalyst between you as a customer and many thousands of upstreams, not just the Linux kernel. Take a look at some of the past and ongoing contributions that have come from Red Hat, some of which were influenced by customer requests:

    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Red_Hat_contributions

    When you use a rebuild of Enterprise Linux, you gain the same benefits flowing downstream that Red Hat customers gain, but you change the dynamics of how you can manage your relationship with the upstream.

    Is your in-house support staff prepared to negotiate with upstream projects on your behalf? Work to get patches and features included in the code?

    If they are, that is great; the world needs more corporations that are contributing from within their own IT staff. Again, though, when doing that, having a partner, such as Red Hat, to work with on negotiating through the upstream maze can be helpful.

    People who work to produce Enterprise Linux rebuilds are in the same position with regard to how they can influence the upstream. If they are a paying customer, they can ask Red Hat for help. If not, they are welcome with everyone else to participate in the upstream project for RHEL, which also considers itself the upstream for CentOS, Scientific Linux, Whitebox Linux, and the myriad other rebuilds:

    http://join.fedoraproject.org

    For a long view on how and why this works, I encourage you to take 9 mins and 21 seconds to watch Michael Tiemann talk about "The Open Source Triple Play":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntzp8z14OXQ

    http://www.redhat.com/magazine/001nov04/features/tripleplay/

  • quaid
    RE: RHEL / CentOS
    Yeah, I tend to agree. The enterprise community around RHEL + CentOS/Scientific/etc. (all rebuilds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux) is really one group of people. Where they have to act differently is elsewhere, when exercising their subscription from Red Hat. Which doesn't apply to Linux.com discussions. There is a fair chance that someone using Enterprise Linux is also using CentOS, etc.. No need to segregate.
    Link to this post 14 May 09

    Yeah, I tend to agree. The enterprise community around RHEL + CentOS/Scientific/etc. (all rebuilds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux) is really one group of people. Where they have to act differently is elsewhere, when exercising their subscription from Red Hat. Which doesn't apply to Linux.com discussions.

    There is a fair chance that someone using Enterprise Linux is also using CentOS, etc.. No need to segregate.

  • quaid
    RE: Nvidia problems
    The improved open source Nouveau driver is indeed the default for Fedora 11 (Leonidas). You can test yourself the state of the driver by installing the Release Candidate (RC) when it becomes available in the next few days. Try it in a virtual machine, and please search for or file bugs for anything you find not working right. You can read more about the Nouveau driver feature at these pages: [url]http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/NouveauAsDefault[/url] [url]http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/NouveauModesetting[/url] Not knowing which specific bug you are talking about, I want to point out a good page to watch. This one tracks common bugs, such as video driver issues and hacks, during the release lifecycle: [url]http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Common_F11_bugs[/url] I don't see any bugs about the Nouveau driver there. Nor do I see a mention in the release notes pages about boot or install [url]http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Documentation_Beats_Installer[/url] [url]http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Documentation_Boot_Beats[/url] (Those are the "source" pages that get used to build the actual release notes included in the distro and on [url]http://docs.fedoraproject.org[/url].) With regard to open bugs, there are definitely some of those: [url]https://bugzilla.redhat.com/buglist.cgi?quicksearch=nouveau[/url] You would have to look to see if your particular issue is in there. If it is not, I encourage you to try out the Release Candidate when it is available in the next few days. If you find a bug still, report it via bugzilla.
    Link to this post 14 May 09

    The improved open source Nouveau driver is indeed the default for Fedora 11 (Leonidas). You can test yourself the state of the driver by installing the Release Candidate (RC) when it becomes available in the next few days. Try it in a virtual machine, and please search for or file bugs for anything you find not working right.

    You can read more about the Nouveau driver feature at these pages:

    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/NouveauAsDefault

    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/NouveauModesetting

    Not knowing which specific bug you are talking about, I want to point out a good page to watch. This one tracks common bugs, such as video driver issues and hacks, during the release lifecycle:

    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Common_F11_bugs

    I don't see any bugs about the Nouveau driver there. Nor do I see a mention in the release notes pages about boot or install

    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Documentation_Beats_Installer

    http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Documentation_Boot_Beats

    (Those are the "source" pages that get used to build the actual release notes included in the distro and on http://docs.fedoraproject.org.)

    With regard to open bugs, there are definitely some of those:

    https://bugzilla.redhat.com/buglist.cgi?quicksearch=nouveau

    You would have to look to see if your particular issue is in there. If it is not, I encourage you to try out the Release Candidate when it is available in the next few days. If you find a bug still, report it via bugzilla.

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