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anand44

anand44

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 11
  • Member Since: 25 Apr 11
  • Last Logged In: 04 Jun 11

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  • anand44
    Bluetooth driver for my laptop
    I have a HP G62-361TX laptop whose bluetooth is not working. It shows it;s status is on but does not detect any new device. I gave the command hcitool scan but it returns nothing. I think the bluetooth driver is not installed. How can I solve this??
    Link to this post 16 May 11

    I have a HP G62-361TX laptop whose bluetooth is not working. It shows it;s status is on but does not detect any new device. I gave the command hcitool scan but it returns nothing. I think the bluetooth driver is not installed. How can I solve this??

  • anand44
    Connect Internet through mobile in OpenSuse 11.4
    How can I connect my Nokia 5230 mobile to OpenSuse 11.4 for Internet? I have used Ubuntu, in which they have wvdial but OpenSuse 11.4 does not have wvdial in /etc folder. My phone is detected by OpenSuse but what to do next? :(
    Link to this post 15 May 11

    How can I connect my Nokia 5230 mobile to OpenSuse 11.4 for Internet? I have used Ubuntu, in which they have wvdial but OpenSuse 11.4 does not have wvdial in /etc folder. My phone is detected by OpenSuse but what to do next? :(

  • anand44
    RE: Iam new to Linux and have a few questions.
    [b]Goineasy9 wrote:[/b] [quote]1) Go to the Directory in the top menu. The first choice is download Linux. Although, one does not just download Linux, one downloads a distribution of Linux, depending on what your computer is used for, the hardware it contains and what your particular needs are. For new users I usually recommend the Linux Mint distribution, because, it is the one that is easiest to set up, in my opinion. Usually we recommend downloading a Live CD, so you can experience using Linux before doing an install. Almost every distribution offers a Live CD, or, a Live USB in case your using a netbook or other type of computer that does not have a CD player attached. 2) There are many differences between Linux and Windows Vista. The most valuable difference is the freedom to use, share and modify it to your own specifications. You can't do that with Windows, it is closed, Linux is Open. If you would like to understand what Linux is about, a short video from our 20th Anniversary tells the story pretty well. Watch here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ocq6_3-nEw 3) As I explained in "1)", I usually recommend Linux Mint. As far as being closest to Windows, most distros are set up to somewhat look like Windows. Those using the KDE window manager come closest, although, the present Gnome window manager used in Linux Mint is also similar to the Windows desktop. It doesn't take very much to get used to using either. 4) Internet Explorer and Microsoft Office are not compatible with Linux. Microsoft does not put out versions that run on Linux based operating system. Firefox and Google Chrome are much better replacements for Internet Explorer, and, are much more secure. Internet Explorer has had many vulnerabilities over the years, and since Microsoft doesn't update their products in a timely manner, it is still true today. OpenOffice, or, the more recent LibreOffice are good replacements for Microsoft Office. They work well for me and many others, but, since Microsoft doesn't align itself to the Open Standards, sometimes converting a Windows Office created file with OpenOffice or LibreOffice, can create problems. I convert Microsoft Office files all the time and have not encountered those problems. It all depends on how you use Microsoft Office, and, how many of the advanced commands you embed in your documents/spreadsheets. There is also a web site called DistroWatch, where you can look at ALL the Linux distros available, if you interested. Link here: http://distrowatch.com/index.php?dataspan=4 If you need certain specifications, or would like to tell us what kind of computer you are using, or would like any other questions answered, please just ask. That's what we are here for.[/quote] +1 great tips
    Link to this post 06 May 11

    Goineasy9 wrote:

    1) Go to the Directory in the top menu. The first choice is download Linux. Although, one does not just download Linux, one downloads a distribution of Linux, depending on what your computer is used for, the hardware it contains and what your particular needs are. For new users I usually recommend the Linux Mint distribution, because, it is the one that is easiest to set up, in my opinion. Usually we recommend downloading a Live CD, so you can experience using Linux before doing an install. Almost every distribution offers a Live CD, or, a Live USB in case your using a netbook or other type of computer that does not have a CD player attached.
    2) There are many differences between Linux and Windows Vista. The most valuable difference is the freedom to use, share and modify it to your own specifications. You can't do that with Windows, it is closed, Linux is Open. If you would like to understand what Linux is about, a short video from our 20th Anniversary tells the story pretty well. Watch here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ocq6_3-nEw

    3) As I explained in "1)", I usually recommend Linux Mint. As far as being closest to Windows, most distros are set up to somewhat look like Windows. Those using the KDE window manager come closest, although, the present Gnome window manager used in Linux Mint is also similar to the Windows desktop. It doesn't take very much to get used to using either.
    4) Internet Explorer and Microsoft Office are not compatible with Linux. Microsoft does not put out versions that run on Linux based operating system. Firefox and Google Chrome are much better replacements for Internet Explorer, and, are much more secure. Internet Explorer has had many vulnerabilities over the years, and since Microsoft doesn't update their products in a timely manner, it is still true today. OpenOffice, or, the more recent LibreOffice are good replacements for Microsoft Office. They work well for me and many others, but, since Microsoft doesn't align itself to the Open Standards, sometimes converting a Windows Office created file with OpenOffice or LibreOffice, can create problems. I convert Microsoft Office files all the time and have not encountered those problems. It all depends on how you use Microsoft Office, and, how many of the advanced commands you embed in your documents/spreadsheets.

    There is also a web site called DistroWatch, where you can look at ALL the Linux distros available, if you interested. Link here:
    http://distrowatch.com/index.php?dataspan=4

    If you need certain specifications, or would like to tell us what kind of computer you are using, or would like any other questions answered, please just ask. That's what we are here for.


    +1 great tips

  • anand44
    RE: New to Linux, some newbie questions.
    Definitely Ubuntu is the best Distro for all your need download it from this site [url]http://www.ubuntu.com/download[u][/u][/url] & for web developing just try Bluefish from the Ubuntu Software Center it;s a good HTML editor.
    Link to this post 30 Apr 11

    Definitely Ubuntu is the best Distro for all your need download it from this site http://www.ubuntu.com/download[u][/u] & for web developing just try Bluefish from the Ubuntu Software Center it;s a good HTML editor.

  • anand44
    RE: Welcome to Linux.com
    Hi, my name is Anand Kumar from New Delhi ,India. I am a student . I joined Linux.com because I really like Linux. I am using Linux for more than 4 years. I still remember the first time when I installed Ubuntu I was very scared at that time & also I didn't know anything about it at that time.After that I used several Distro like Linux Mint( my favorite), Fedora, OpenSuse, PCLOS, Kubuntu, Knoppix, Slax. I am now planning to make a career in Linux Administration for that I am preparing for RHCE & of course LINUX.COM is helping me a lot.
    Link to this post 30 Apr 11

    Hi, my name is Anand Kumar from New Delhi ,India. I am a student . I joined Linux.com because I really like Linux. I am using Linux for more than 4 years. I still remember the first time when I installed Ubuntu I was very scared at that time & also I didn't know anything about it at that time.After that I used several Distro like Linux Mint( my favorite), Fedora, OpenSuse, PCLOS, Kubuntu, Knoppix, Slax. I am now planning to make a career in Linux Administration for that I am preparing for RHCE & of course LINUX.COM is helping me a lot.

  • anand44
    RE: How to install OpenSuse 11.4 KDE iso through USB
    I have tried both the weblinks above but it just hangs when I select live cd option or installation option from the first menu.I have not checked the ISO for any errors ,kindly tell how to check it for errors.
    Link to this post 26 Apr 11

    I have tried both the weblinks above but it just hangs when I select live cd option or installation option from the first menu.I have not checked the ISO for any errors ,kindly tell how to check it for errors.

  • anand44
    How to install OpenSuse 11.4 KDE iso through USB
    I have downloaded the OpenSuse 11.4 iso. My problem is that my DVD drive is not working so I used suse image writer from the OpenSuse website to make a bootable usb but it hangs after the boot,please suggest me a way out from this as how to install it from the pen drive? I have presently Linux Mint 10 & Win7 installed as my OS.:(
    Link to this post 26 Apr 11

    I have downloaded the OpenSuse 11.4 iso. My problem is that my DVD drive is not working so I used suse image writer from the OpenSuse website to make a bootable usb but it hangs after the boot,please suggest me a way out from this as how to install it from the pen drive? I have presently
    Linux Mint 10 & Win7 installed as my OS.:(

  • anand44
    RE: Linux Worries
    [b]mode wrote:[/b] [quote]That sounds like a viable idea. Installing Linux alongside windows would mean at startup, there is an option as to what OS u want to boot?[/quote] You don't have to leave Windows to install Linux. My suggestion is that you should download the Ubuntu 11.04 releasing on 28th April & install it from making a live usb through unetbootin download it from here [url]http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/unetbootin-windows-latest.exe[/url][u][/u][b][/b], the steps are provided in this link[url]http://www.pendrivelinux.com/using-unetbootin-to-create-a-live-usb-linux/[u][/u][/url][b][/b]
    Link to this post 26 Apr 11

    mode wrote:

    That sounds like a viable idea. Installing Linux alongside windows would mean at startup, there is an option as to what OS u want to boot?


    You don't have to leave Windows to install Linux. My suggestion is that you should download the Ubuntu 11.04 releasing on 28th April & install it from making a live usb through unetbootin download it from here http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/unetbootin-windows-latest.exe, the steps are provided in this linkhttp://www.pendrivelinux.com/using-unetbootin-to-create-a-live-usb-linux/[u][/u]

  • anand44
    RE: Learning linux severs: Red Hat or Centos ?
    [b]atreyu wrote:[/b] [quote]The short answer is "yes". My understanding of CentOS is, they ripped out everything proprietary from Red Hat (logos, etc.) and rebuilt the packages from the source RPMS (that Red Hat is obliged to provide). I can tell you that I support Red Hat EL servers at my work and we use CentOS all the time for our development servers and workstations, when we can get away with it (i.e. when customer does not require RHEL) b/c we have never once run into an issue using it instead of RHEL. For example, every piece of code that we write (and package as an RPM) we can install onto a CentOS box and it works perfectly. Similarly, we can take any package that was built for a RHEL system (either binary or rebuilt from SRPM, if we feel like doing the extra work - but usually is not necessary) and install it on CentOS again, with no compatibility problems whatsoever. Plus, it is a great way to have a RHEL server at home for you to play with, and not have to worry about the license. -bill[/quote] +1 CentOS is definitely is a free version of Red Hat Fedora.
    Link to this post 26 Apr 11

    atreyu wrote:

    The short answer is "yes". My understanding of CentOS is, they ripped out everything proprietary from Red Hat (logos, etc.) and rebuilt the packages from the source RPMS (that Red Hat is obliged to provide).

    I can tell you that I support Red Hat EL servers at my work and we use CentOS all the time for our development servers and workstations, when we can get away with it (i.e. when customer does not require RHEL) b/c we have never once run into an issue using it instead of RHEL. For example, every piece of code that we write (and package as an RPM) we can install onto a CentOS box and it works perfectly. Similarly, we can take any package that was built for a RHEL system (either binary or rebuilt from SRPM, if we feel like doing the extra work - but usually is not necessary) and install it on CentOS again, with no compatibility problems whatsoever.

    Plus, it is a great way to have a RHEL server at home for you to play with, and not have to worry about the license.

    -bill


    +1 CentOS is definitely is a free version of Red Hat Fedora.

  • anand44
    RE: OpenOffice
    [b]ollerref wrote:[/b] [quote]very new. what and where are they. are there more than one? just learning and don''t know what any terms mean. have used windows forever and want and need to do more. need to learn. help please.[/quote] First tell me which OS are you using?
    Link to this post 26 Apr 11

    ollerref wrote:

    very new. what and where are they. are there more than one? just learning and don''t know what any terms mean. have used windows forever and want and need to do more. need to learn. help please.

    First tell me which OS are you using?

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