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Gossamer

Gossamer

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 22
  • Member Since: 18 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 08 Jun 09

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  • Gossamer
    RE: Realtek RTL8139/810x F and Broadcom 802.11b/g WLAN
    [b]thehappypenguin wrote:[/b] [quote]Thanks Gossamer, but how do i access the windows drivers from Mandriva? And what do you mean by repositries (sorry, but I'm new to linux)[/quote] Actually, the same you would with Windows. As it turns out the broadcom drivers don't actually install, they just extract. See windows would normally just let you locate the drivers via device manager, that location of course would be the place you extracted the files. Basically this is the same-game. You go to broadcom's site, locate your hardware and download the driver for it. Then use wine to extract the files. YOU DO happen to have a different card than I do, however the premise is still the same, ndiswrapper works on tons of hardware including stubborn old hardware and devices that aren't so Linux friendly.
    Link to this post 08 Jun 09

    thehappypenguin wrote:

    Thanks Gossamer, but how do i access the windows drivers from Mandriva?
    And what do you mean by repositries (sorry, but I'm new to linux)

    Actually, the same you would with Windows. As it turns out the broadcom drivers don't actually install, they just extract.

    See windows would normally just let you locate the drivers via device manager, that location of course would be the place you extracted the files.

    Basically this is the same-game. You go to broadcom's site, locate your hardware and download the driver for it. Then use wine to extract the files.

    YOU DO happen to have a different card than I do, however the premise is still the same, ndiswrapper works on tons of hardware including stubborn old hardware and devices that aren't so Linux friendly.

  • Gossamer
    RE: Games which are Linux-only
    Nexuiz has always been my favorite, and there are a few commercial games. Vendetta is very similar to EVE Online, I think the rate is about the same as well and it has a native Linux client. The same goes for Enemy Territory Quake Wars, it has a native Linux client, I think it retails for $40.
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    Nexuiz has always been my favorite, and there are a few commercial games.

    Vendetta is very similar to EVE Online, I think the rate is about the same as well and it has a native Linux client.

    The same goes for Enemy Territory Quake Wars, it has a native Linux client, I think it retails for $40.

  • Gossamer
    RE: Why do you love Debian?
    [b]masinick wrote:[/b] [quote]Naturally, I use Debian and all these derivatives because they just work, and they work exceedingly well. Oh yes, the aspect of a rolling upgrade with Debian Sid derivatives is a compelling feature too![/quote] Same with testing; I'm not masochistic enough for Sid, lol. I love rolling releases.
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    masinick wrote:

    Naturally, I use Debian and all these derivatives because they just work, and they work exceedingly well.

    Oh yes, the aspect of a rolling upgrade with Debian Sid derivatives is a compelling feature too!

    Same with testing; I'm not masochistic enough for Sid, lol.
    I love rolling releases.

  • Gossamer
    Turtle Beach soundcards
    I've got one picked out to use between Debian and Windows. Any one have any luck with these? I'm a 64bit user btw, I've heard Turtle Beach doesn't supply it's own 64bit drivers(it doesn't even code any) I trust ALSA and/or OSS to set things right, Windows normally finds whatever driver it can from wherever it can to get something to work although I've heard of other card's drivers working with these cards in 64-bit.
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    I've got one picked out to use between Debian and Windows. Any one have any luck with these?

    I'm a 64bit user btw, I've heard Turtle Beach doesn't supply it's own 64bit drivers(it doesn't even code any)

    I trust ALSA and/or OSS to set things right, Windows normally finds whatever driver it can from wherever it can to get something to work although I've heard of other card's drivers working with these cards in 64-bit.

  • Gossamer
    RE: Using Linux to fix Windows
    Surprisingly so, I've never had to use Linux to fix Windows. I have used a few Boot disks that reset MBR's and things(my favorite being supergrub). I have used a Linux boot CD to fix a Linux installation, one time xorg went crazy and I copied my xorg.conf from a Ubuntu DVD to my debian partition's xorg.conf. Damn fglrx-driver.
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    Surprisingly so, I've never had to use Linux to fix Windows. I have used a few Boot disks that reset MBR's and things(my favorite being supergrub).

    I have used a Linux boot CD to fix a Linux installation, one time xorg went crazy and I copied my xorg.conf from a Ubuntu DVD to my debian partition's xorg.conf.


    Damn fglrx-driver.

  • Gossamer
    The Great KDE vs. GNOME thread.
    First of all, I'm a Gnome person. I like KDE, I really do; but for some reason I just... can't get comfortable with it. I don't know, I'm not even Mac-ish in nature. I don't like two-taskbars and such and for some reason I still like Gnome and xcfe4. What is the mass' opinions?
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    First of all, I'm a Gnome person. I like KDE, I really do; but for some reason I just... can't get comfortable with it.

    I don't know, I'm not even Mac-ish in nature. I don't like two-taskbars and such and for some reason I still like Gnome and xcfe4.


    What is the mass' opinions?

  • Gossamer
    RE: Linux Users Love Cats, Too!
    Cats > Dogs. It isn't an opinion, m'man. It's a fact.
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    Cats > Dogs.

    It isn't an opinion, m'man. It's a fact.

  • Gossamer
    RE: Should I Try Fedora?
    Fedora was... OK, I didn't get too in-depth with it although I've only ran it though virtualbox. Basically the only difference I saw between it and Ubuntu was the package manager, although; like I said. I didn't spend much time with it... I'm talking like... not even two hours before I got bored.
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    Fedora was... OK, I didn't get too in-depth with it although I've only ran it though virtualbox. Basically the only difference I saw between it and Ubuntu was the package manager, although; like I said. I didn't spend much time with it...

    I'm talking like... not even two hours before I got bored.

  • Gossamer
    RE: Realtek RTL8139/810x F and Broadcom 802.11b/g WLAN
    I know your pain. I run one of the first sony vaios to be released and I have to use a network card to access the internet. Well here's how I did it in Debian:: First and foremost, I had to locate the Windows Drivers. This was easy enough, now all I have to do is extract them using wine and rip out the .inf file that accompanies my wireless driver. Got it. You should see a file called bcm43xx.inf or bcmsomethingorother.inf... anything like that, it should be.... somewhat obvious. Ok, now I need a program called "ndiswrapper", normally it can be built from module-assistant or acquired from whatever repository or method Mandriva uses. Got it set up? good. Now, cd to the location of the .inf file you extracted by running the .exe file for the driver. Good, now run:: ndiswrapper -i *drivername*.inf good, now do:: ndiswrapper -mi or ndiswrapper -m This will write the module you just installed to your module section... Well then, just one more thing; lets see if it worked. run:: ndiswrapper -l this will show you what drivers are installed and whether the hardware is recognized. If all is good, reboot. If all isn't consult someone else that knows more than I do. After reboot, wifi-radar or whatever program you're using should be able to utilize the card so you can get online. --- Hope that helped -Goss
    Link to this post 07 Jun 09

    I know your pain. I run one of the first sony vaios to be released and I have to use a network card to access the internet. Well here's how I did it in Debian::

    First and foremost, I had to locate the Windows Drivers. This was easy enough, now all I have to do is extract them using wine and rip out the .inf file that accompanies my wireless driver.

    Got it.

    You should see a file called bcm43xx.inf or bcmsomethingorother.inf... anything like that, it should be.... somewhat obvious.

    Ok, now I need a program called "ndiswrapper", normally it can be built from module-assistant or acquired from whatever repository or method Mandriva uses.

    Got it set up? good.

    Now, cd to the location of the .inf file you extracted by running the .exe file for the driver.

    Good, now run::

    ndiswrapper -i *drivername*.inf

    good, now do::

    ndiswrapper -mi
    or
    ndiswrapper -m

    This will write the module you just installed to your module section...
    Well then, just one more thing; lets see if it worked.

    run::

    ndiswrapper -l

    this will show you what drivers are installed and whether the hardware is recognized. If all is good, reboot. If all isn't consult someone else that knows more than I do.

    After reboot, wifi-radar or whatever program you're using should be able to utilize the card so you can get online.


    ---

    Hope that helped
    -Goss

  • Gossamer
    Distro logo in ASCII at terminal on startup.
    I've noticed that the Arch-heads have been doing this for a while and it's kind of become a, "If you don't know how, you never will" sort of thing. Basically it's some sort of script that allows your terminal, on startup to display different ASCII codes via some sort of... work. I have no idea how it's done but I know a few of you run Arch around here, so maybe you can guide us apt-getters on how to do it?
    Link to this post 21 May 09

    I've noticed that the Arch-heads have been doing this for a while and it's kind of become a, "If you don't know how, you never will" sort of thing.

    Basically it's some sort of script that allows your terminal, on startup to display different ASCII codes via some sort of... work.

    I have no idea how it's done but I know a few of you run Arch around here, so maybe you can guide us apt-getters on how to do it?

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