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kryptikos

kryptikos

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  • Posts: 61
  • Member Since: 18 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 06 Apr 11

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  • kryptikos
    RE: Arch Won't Boot
    Hi...initrd is the [b]initial ramdisk[/b]...it's not the harddisk itself. Rather it is the temporary filesystem that is used to bring up the kernel and mount the main filesystem. Think of it as a starter on your car engine. It provides the juice to get the engine started until it is self sustained. Normally in a standard Linux set up the kernel image that is initialized (called [b]vmlinuz[/b]) lives in your [b]/boot[/b] partition. From what I can see in your grub set up yours is referencing just / [quote]Filesystem type is ext2fs, partition type 0x83 kernel /vmlinuz26 root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/CE30-78B6 ro [Linux-bzImage, setup=0x3600, size=0x1abaa0] initrd /kernel126.img[/quote] Should be [quote]kernel[b] /boot/[/b]vmlinuz26 root= etc etc etc[/quote] Either way your grub boot partition is foobooed (good technical term for broke, corrupt or gone. It sounds like you've tired multiple things so I'm not sure what exists or how corrupt it might be. A simple thing to try is to boot into a live CD and then chroot into the filesystem and then run the following commands: 1. grub 2. find /boot/grub/stage1 3. root (hd0,0) 4. setup (hd0) 5. quit It might even be a better idea to start with fdisk -l /dev/hda (or sda) to see what partitions it shows on the disk. You are looking for the boot partition or if you went strictly to MBR. Then reboot. If grub is still capable of being repaired it should boot up correctly. If not there are other issues and we'd need to see the errors you are getting. By the way, the error you received on hd0,1 is from you trying to set the swap partition as the root. That won't work. You know it is swap by the type number of 82.
    Link to this post 15 Aug 09

    Hi...initrd is the initial ramdisk...it's not the harddisk itself. Rather it is the temporary filesystem that is used to bring up the kernel and mount the main filesystem. Think of it as a starter on your car engine. It provides the juice to get the engine started until it is self sustained.

    Normally in a standard Linux set up the kernel image that is initialized (called vmlinuz) lives in your /boot partition. From what I can see in your grub set up yours is referencing just /

    Filesystem type is ext2fs, partition type 0x83
    kernel /vmlinuz26 root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/CE30-78B6 ro
    [Linux-bzImage, setup=0x3600, size=0x1abaa0]
    initrd /kernel126.img

    Should be

    kernel[b] /boot/[/b]vmlinuz26 root= etc etc etc

    Either way your grub boot partition is foobooed (good technical term for broke, corrupt or gone. It sounds like you've tired multiple things so I'm not sure what exists or how corrupt it might be. A simple thing to try is to boot into a live CD and then chroot into the filesystem and then run the following commands:

    1. grub
    2. find /boot/grub/stage1
    3. root (hd0,0)
    4. setup (hd0)
    5. quit

    It might even be a better idea to start with fdisk -l /dev/hda (or sda) to see what partitions it shows on the disk. You are looking for the boot partition or if you went strictly to MBR.

    Then reboot. If grub is still capable of being repaired it should boot up correctly. If not there are other issues and we'd need to see the errors you are getting.

    By the way, the error you received on hd0,1 is from you trying to set the swap partition as the root. That won't work. You know it is swap by the type number of 82.

  • kryptikos
    RE: Any suggestions? No seriously, I need them.
    [b]YoyoKirby wrote:[/b] [quote]Now I've been using Linux for about a year now, and I feel that I don't know enough about it or about terminal commands. Could anyone suggest some commands to get comfortable with. I know apt-get install and aptitude search. I know a few others, but I use those mostly. Now, I've tried several distributions and found a few that I currently use. Ubuntu on PC, and #!Crunchbang on laptop. I know that #!Crunchbang is an offshoot of Ubuntu, so there's not [i]that[/i] many differences to learn. I was just kinda wondering which distribution would get me to learn more, faster. Because the faster I learn, the more I can be useful for this site.[/quote] Alot of good suggestions on here, but remember, it's all Linux. The packaging may be Arch, Ubuntu, Debian, Gentoo etc etc, but the functionality is the same. What you can do on one distro you can do the same on another. It may differ slightly in package management, install method, use of logical volumes etc, but the kernel is the kernel. I applaud your desire to want to learn more about how Linux works and command structure. If you wanted to build a Linux box from the very beginning to understand the process and compiling then start with Linux from scratch ([url]http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/[/url]). As far as tutorials if you'd like a nitty gritty view of Linux the LPI prep documents are very good to go through: [url]http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes/101-letter.pdf[/url] [url]http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes/102-letter.pdf[/url] This will be an excellent start for learning how to command-line your way through Linux and understand what/how/when the OS does things. Hopefully that will help a bit :) Feel free to ask more questions while you are learning! Good luck!!
    Link to this post 14 Aug 09

    YoyoKirby wrote:

    Now I've been using Linux for about a year now, and I feel that I don't know enough about it or about terminal commands. Could anyone suggest some commands to get comfortable with.

    I know apt-get install and aptitude search. I know a few others, but I use those mostly.

    Now, I've tried several distributions and found a few that I currently use. Ubuntu on PC, and #!Crunchbang on laptop. I know that #!Crunchbang is an offshoot of Ubuntu, so there's not [i]that[/i] many differences to learn. I was just kinda wondering which distribution would get me to learn more, faster. Because the faster I learn, the more I can be useful for this site.

    Alot of good suggestions on here, but remember, it's all Linux. The packaging may be Arch, Ubuntu, Debian, Gentoo etc etc, but the functionality is the same. What you can do on one distro you can do the same on another. It may differ slightly in package management, install method, use of logical volumes etc, but the kernel is the kernel.

    I applaud your desire to want to learn more about how Linux works and command structure. If you wanted to build a Linux box from the very beginning to understand the process and compiling then start with Linux from scratch (http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/).

    As far as tutorials if you'd like a nitty gritty view of Linux the LPI prep documents are very good to go through:

    http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes/101-letter.pdf

    http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes/102-letter.pdf

    This will be an excellent start for learning how to command-line your way through Linux and understand what/how/when the OS does things. Hopefully that will help a bit :)

    Feel free to ask more questions while you are learning!

    Good luck!!

  • kryptikos
    RE: Popup message in winXP workgroup PC in a network
    You'd have to use a combination of SAMBA and XP's 'net send' functionality. Be aware though that messaging service in XP is usually turned off. You'd have to start it on all the machines that you wanted to send messages to. Here's a link that can get you started: [url]http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=44264[/url]
    Link to this post 12 Aug 09

    You'd have to use a combination of SAMBA and XP's 'net send' functionality. Be aware though that messaging service in XP is usually turned off. You'd have to start it on all the machines that you wanted to send messages to.

    Here's a link that can get you started:

    http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=44264

  • kryptikos
    RE: Code in Squid.conf to block user's Web surfing
    You can block it based on a network source. [url]http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/wiki/index.php/Quick_HOWTO_:_Ch32_:_Controlling_Web_Access_with_Squid#Access_Control_Lists[/url] You can also use an authentication piece and then deny based on user.
    Link to this post 12 Aug 09

    You can block it based on a network source.

    http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/wiki/index.php/Quick_HOWTO_:_Ch32_:_Controlling_Web_Access_with_Squid#Access_Control_Lists

    You can also use an authentication piece and then deny based on user.

  • kryptikos
    RE: never used cfdisk before, small HDD as well.
    Hi ejames... Short answer is yes, DSL will work fine on your harddrive. It is specifically designed to be as minimal and yet as functional as possible, so ~550 MB hard disk will work just fine. The entire load of DSL can be as small as 50MB. My advice would be to blow away all existing partitions on the disk. If you don't remember what is there and have no need for the data (if any) it is more simple to start fresh and not run into issues later. Best place to start is their community wiki. They have specific techniques to install on hard drives. The first link is the main page for HDD installation. You can do it manually, or use the second link will will walk you through how to use their internal HDD script that will do the major work for you. [url]http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/wiki/index.php/Installing_to_the_Hard_Disk[/url] [url]http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/dsl-hd-install.html[/url] Hopefully that steers you in the right direction. Let me know if you run into issues. :)
    Link to this post 12 Aug 09

    Hi ejames...

    Short answer is yes, DSL will work fine on your harddrive. It is specifically designed to be as minimal and yet as functional as possible, so ~550 MB hard disk will work just fine. The entire load of DSL can be as small as 50MB.

    My advice would be to blow away all existing partitions on the disk. If you don't remember what is there and have no need for the data (if any) it is more simple to start fresh and not run into issues later.

    Best place to start is their community wiki. They have specific techniques to install on hard drives. The first link is the main page for HDD installation. You can do it manually, or use the second link will will walk you through how to use their internal HDD script that will do the major work for you.

    http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/wiki/index.php/Installing_to_the_Hard_Disk

    http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/dsl-hd-install.html

    Hopefully that steers you in the right direction. Let me know if you run into issues.

    :)

  • kryptikos
    RE: weird problem running programs as normal user
    Hi Bofhorg Just a couple of quick questions. Is the openoffice the version that was included with your openSUSE? Have you tried installing the package again via the repositories? What version of Java do you have on the box? Was your 11.1 an upgrade from 10.3 or a full install? What version of Oo are you using? Might try renaming the user Oo folder and letting Oo regenerate it with defaults. Could be conflict there: mv /home//.ooo-2.0/ /home//.ooo-2.0.old
    Link to this post 10 Aug 09

    Hi Bofhorg

    Just a couple of quick questions. Is the openoffice the version that was included with your openSUSE? Have you tried installing the package again via the repositories? What version of Java do you have on the box? Was your 11.1 an upgrade from 10.3 or a full install? What version of Oo are you using?

    Might try renaming the user Oo folder and letting Oo regenerate it with defaults. Could be conflict there:

    mv /home/<user>/.ooo-2.0/ /home/<user>/.ooo-2.0.old

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