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poundjd

poundjd

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 3
  • Member Since: 18 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 23 Mar 10

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  • poundjd
    RE: best easy and complete distro
    I would offer Ubuntu.
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    I would offer Ubuntu.

  • poundjd
    RE: difference in GUI & CLI in command execution
    Actually it is not a "problem". the CLI was and for many remains the primary interface to the system. Almost all commands were writen to work with the CLI. there are lots of special cases like that that enhance the CLI. These special cases are not input to the command but are processes by the shell or CLI. Xterm does not process these shell commands. that is why the same string will produce different effects in a CLI and Xtem command windows. -jeff
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    Actually it is not a "problem". the CLI was and for many remains the primary interface to the system. Almost all commands were writen to work with the CLI. there are lots of special cases like that that enhance the CLI. These special cases are not input to the command but are processes by the shell or CLI. Xterm does not process these shell commands. that is why the same string will produce different effects in a CLI and Xtem command windows.
    -jeff

  • poundjd
    RE: command execution
    In UNIX land most commands are written to operate as a filter. It accepts input from a thing called Standard Input, and if it has any out put it writes it to a thing called Standard Output. Normally the Standard Input accepts input from the keyboard, and Standard Output is written to the screen. There is also another "standard" output channel, its called (if I remember correctly) 'Standard Error" which is almost always mapped to the screen. All of these can be redirected from their normal mapping to other sources and sinks. Many UNIX commands work with a special remapping symbol "|" called the "pipe". The pipe takes the standard output from one command and feeds it into the standard input of the following command. An example is "ls | more". The "ls" reads the current directory and lists the files. The "more" command accepts input and displays it on the screen, if the input is such that it would more than fill the screen then it paginates the output so that the output does not run off the top of the screen. So "ls | more" will read the current directory and display the list one page at a time. -jeff
    Link to this post 27 May 09

    In UNIX land most commands are written to operate as a filter. It accepts input from a thing called Standard Input, and if it has any out put it writes it to a thing called Standard Output. Normally the Standard Input accepts input from the keyboard, and Standard Output is written to the screen. There is also another "standard" output channel, its called (if I remember correctly) 'Standard Error" which is almost always mapped to the screen. All of these can be redirected from their normal mapping to other sources and sinks. Many UNIX commands work with a special remapping symbol "|" called the "pipe". The pipe takes the standard output from one command and feeds it into the standard input of the following command. An example is "ls | more". The "ls" reads the current directory and lists the files. The "more" command accepts input and displays it on the screen, if the input is such that it would more than fill the screen then it paginates the output so that the output does not run off the top of the screen. So "ls | more" will read the current directory and display the list one page at a time.
    -jeff

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