Linux.com

OjM

OjM

  • Linux.com Member
  • Posts: 8
  • Member Since: 13 May 09
  • Last Logged In: 6 days ago

Latest Posts

Posted by
Topic
Post Preview
Posted
  • OjM
    RE: Programming C++ and C#
    [quote]My second question is: Are there any good programming suites out on the Linux platform suitable for a newcommer to programming? All I'm really looking for is syntaxchecking, autocompletion and being able to compile and run the code right in the box without having to switch around a lot.[/quote] Hi, I'm also learning to program C, and I'd recommend Vim for those needs. It's a text-editor. A really productive one. Though it has a funny learning curve, because it's something you have never used before. http://www.viemu.com/a-why-vi-vim.html
    Link to this post 03 Aug 09

    My second question is: Are there any good programming suites out on the Linux platform suitable for a newcommer to programming? All I'm really looking for is syntaxchecking, autocompletion and being able to compile and run the code right in the box without having to switch around a lot.

    Hi, I'm also learning to program C, and I'd recommend Vim for those needs. It's a text-editor. A really productive one. Though it has a funny learning curve, because it's something you have never used before.

    http://www.viemu.com/a-why-vi-vim.html

  • OjM
    RE: Any suggestions? No seriously, I need them.
    Try INX (Inx is not X), it's not only about terminal commands, it teaches you to be able to live on command line. It's a command line based distribution for command line newbies! Based on Ubuntu. http://inx.maincontent.net/ It teaches you to use Screen, show you that it's possible to watch movies without X, browse web with images and a lot more. You can use that environment to learn about the commands too.
    Link to this post 18 Jul 09

    Try INX (Inx is not X), it's not only about terminal commands, it teaches you to be able to live on command line. It's a command line based distribution for command line newbies! Based on Ubuntu.

    http://inx.maincontent.net/

    It teaches you to use Screen, show you that it's possible to watch movies without X, browse web with images and a lot more. You can use that environment to learn about the commands too.

  • OjM
    RE: Is linux right for me?
    1. Adobe Photoshop CS2 2. Autodesk 3DS max 2009 x32 3. Steam to play Counter strike source, and work on my own source mod. 4. Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 5. My wacom tablet 1. Photoshop cs2 Works with Wine with minor problems. http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=2631&iTestingId=40027 2. 3DS max 2009 does not 3. CSS works well http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=3731 4 Works perfectly http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=31 5 Wacom works, I've used one recently. Needed to configure a bit for ubuntu 8.10, but should work out of the box for 9.04. I'm smelling for motives, I'm asking if you were just trying to mess with us by listing some clichés which should not work. Like Microsoft would ever release a Linux version of their IDE:s. And not to mention that I think it's just a wrong way to go using Microsoft products with Linux, but that's not my headache. So, most should work. There are plenty of alternatives to 3DS max, I'd recommend Blender 3D. It will seem to be hard at first, but when you learn the ropes, you'r workflow will be faster. Also, no worrying for malware and better overall security, no need to reinstall after a while, unless you get hooked to distrohopping like me. no stupid activation schemes, no restrictions for using Linux... I'd say it is, but you have to choose whether you think the freedom is worth it.
    Link to this post 17 May 09

    1. Adobe Photoshop CS2
    2. Autodesk 3DS max 2009 x32
    3. Steam to play Counter strike source, and work on my own source mod.
    4. Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0
    5. My wacom tablet

    1. Photoshop cs2 Works with Wine with minor problems. http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=2631&iTestingId=40027

    2. 3DS max 2009 does not

    3. CSS works well http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=3731

    4 Works perfectly http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=31

    5 Wacom works, I've used one recently. Needed to configure a bit for ubuntu 8.10, but should work out of the box for 9.04.

    I'm smelling for motives, I'm asking if you were just trying to mess with us by listing some clichés which should not work. Like Microsoft would ever release a Linux version of their IDE:s. And not to mention that I think it's just a wrong way to go using Microsoft products with Linux, but that's not my headache.

    So, most should work. There are plenty of alternatives to 3DS max, I'd recommend Blender 3D. It will seem to be hard at first, but when you learn the ropes, you'r workflow will be faster.

    Also, no worrying for malware and better overall security, no need to reinstall after a while, unless you get hooked to distrohopping like me. no stupid activation schemes, no restrictions for using Linux...

    I'd say it is, but you have to choose whether you think the freedom is worth it.

  • OjM
    RE: Do we ever question Linux?
    [quote]While it’s fragmented, there are some websites that are more popular than others; and some are first choices for many of us for searching (Google), communicating (Facebook, Twitter), general knownledge (Wikipedia) and videos (YouTube).[/quote] I wouldn not call webs "fragmented", there just is a lot of information, and a lot of crap. [quote]It seems to me that package managers share the same goal; to manage packages–or–to manage software. Installation, removal and updating of software. Just like web browsers are different, I think it’s cool that package mangers do the implementation a bit different—but wouldn’t it make life in Linux‐land five hundred percent easier if we all agreed upon a single package format?[/quote] Exactly what kind of problems do you have with packages? There are a lot of source packages, .debs and .rpms. We all can tell them apart easily and the others are not so widespread. How would standardizing the package format help your life at all, not to mention by 500%? I would still just apt-get my software with debian-based systems, and with source based systems I'd just compile it with or without package manager. The reason why that standardthingy would not do what you think it would, is basically because people would still need to publish their source packages too and newbs would still get confused thinking if they should download that .stnrd or that .tar.gz. The harsh reality being that the newbies should not download anything at all if they do not know what they are doing, so it's not a bad thing they get confused. [quote]Maintainers wouldn’t have to exist, and time could be better spent figuring out how to distribute packages in more effective ways, such as BitTorrent. What do you think?[/quote] I call that propaganda. Debian for an example, seems to have quite strict packaging requirements. They would not just take any package they get and add it in repositories, but they would need to see if the package has been made like it should be. Maintainers would still be necessary. Packages with BitTorrent? If I make a package and want to share it, I'll just create a page in the webs for it. I do not have a bittorrent server running 24/7 for making sure people can get or even see my package if it's not yet well known and wanted and has nobody seeding. Web page is the simplest way. //edit And you need to upload 64bit packages too, which doubles the confusion. And soon ARM's and maybe others...
    Link to this post 17 May 09

    While it’s fragmented, there are some websites that are more popular than others; and some are first choices for many of us for searching (Google), communicating (Facebook, Twitter), general knownledge (Wikipedia) and videos (YouTube).

    I wouldn not call webs "fragmented", there just is a lot of information, and a lot of crap.

    It seems to me that package managers share the same goal; to manage packages–or–to manage software. Installation, removal and updating of software. Just like web browsers are different, I think it’s cool that package mangers do the implementation a bit different—but wouldn’t it make life in Linux‐land five hundred percent easier if we all agreed upon a single package format?

    Exactly what kind of problems do you have with packages? There are a lot of source packages, .debs and .rpms. We all can tell them apart easily and the others are not so widespread.

    How would standardizing the package format help your life at all, not to mention by 500%? I would still just apt-get my software with debian-based systems, and with source based systems I'd just compile it with or without package manager.

    The reason why that standardthingy would not do what you think it would, is basically because people would still need to publish their source packages too and newbs would still get confused thinking if they should download that .stnrd or that .tar.gz. The harsh reality being that the newbies should not download anything at all if they do not know what they are doing, so it's not a bad thing they get confused.

    Maintainers wouldn’t have to exist, and time could be better spent figuring out how to distribute packages in more effective ways, such as BitTorrent. What do you think?

    I call that propaganda. Debian for an example, seems to have quite strict packaging requirements. They would not just take any package they get and add it in repositories, but they would need to see if the package has been made like it should be. Maintainers would still be necessary.

    Packages with BitTorrent? If I make a package and want to share it, I'll just create a page in the webs for it. I do not have a bittorrent server running 24/7 for making sure people can get or even see my package if it's not yet well known and wanted and has nobody seeding. Web page is the simplest way.

    //edit And you need to upload 64bit packages too, which doubles the confusion. And soon ARM's and maybe others...

  • OjM
    RE: Do we ever question Linux?
    [quote][quote]Another question, is the command line mode needed in 2009? Can the powerful grep, pipe, less‐stuff be replaced by a snappy file manager with some filtered views? And why can’t Linux have a nice and smooth startup screen like Windows and OS X?[/quote] Maybe plugins/extensions for the different file managers could be implementated but in the end dont take the cli away , why alienate? The cli is powerful , and much needed. Also many different kinds of shells out their. Bash is just the most widely implementated. Startup screens are just eye candy in my opinion, their are programs out their that do exactly this. In the end though every distro basically does their own thing.[/quote] You are so not going to take my cli away. I do not need the eye-candy. The only thing eye-candy is useful for me is showing my friends how cool a desktop can be when you are free. I prefer going small and learning cli tools. Why would I need a fancy graphical interface for music player? Irc?
    Link to this post 15 May 09

    [quote]Another question, is the command line mode needed in 2009? Can the powerful grep, pipe, less‐stuff be replaced by a snappy file manager with some filtered views? And why can’t Linux have a nice and smooth startup screen like Windows and OS X?

    Maybe plugins/extensions for the different file managers could be implementated but in the end dont take the cli away , why alienate? The cli is powerful , and much needed. Also many different kinds of shells out their. Bash is just the most widely implementated. Startup screens are just eye candy in my opinion, their are programs out their that do exactly this. In the end though every distro basically does their own thing.[/quote]

    You are so not going to take my cli away. I do not need the eye-candy. The only thing eye-candy is useful for me is showing my friends how cool a desktop can be when you are free. I prefer going small and learning cli tools. Why would I need a fancy graphical interface for music player? Irc?

  • OjM
    RE: Do we ever question Linux?
    A big no here. I do think that by having a standard package, desktop and everything everywhere would definitely help Linux get more users fast. But the goal of Linux has never been getting all the users. Linus said that Microsoft going down is just a inevitable side effect. Now, Linux is not just the kernel. Linux is not a full operating system. This community page is what Linux is. It is choice, anyone can create their own software adn use it in their own distribution. Anyone can decide they will not use a package manager at all. We are all working towards a common goan, but we all have our own approach. However, it is not good to force your approach to everyone. If .rpm were everywhere, it would be a lot easier to hurt Linux by malware, because it works everywhere. It would be a sad thing for Gentoo, SourceMage and other source-based distributions, if they were forced to use .rpm. You do know that kind of feat, de facto package that is, is not going to happen without using force. There goes the freedom. There is a different X system, Xvesa or something which is used by Slitaz and DSL. It's just stupid to think they are deprecated, old and a bad thing generally. Because of it, it's possible to create a really small distribution with full graphical desktop. Not to mention that there is a distribution for newbies that does not have any X at all. INX (INX is not X). It is never going to happen. Only way to achieve that is to make package format so good that everyone wants to use it. I declare this discussion old. It has been around for so long and it's just in vain. Not going to happen and we all know it.
    Link to this post 15 May 09

    A big no here.

    I do think that by having a standard package, desktop and everything everywhere would definitely help Linux get more users fast.

    But the goal of Linux has never been getting all the users. Linus said that Microsoft going down is just a inevitable side effect.

    Now, Linux is not just the kernel. Linux is not a full operating system. This community page is what Linux is. It is choice, anyone can create their own software adn use it in their own distribution. Anyone can decide they will not use a package manager at all. We are all working towards a common goan, but we all have our own approach. However, it is not good to force your approach to everyone.

    If .rpm were everywhere, it would be a lot easier to hurt Linux by malware, because it works everywhere. It would be a sad thing for Gentoo, SourceMage and other source-based distributions, if they were forced to use .rpm. You do know that kind of feat, de facto package that is, is not going to happen without using force. There goes the freedom.

    There is a different X system, Xvesa or something which is used by Slitaz and DSL. It's just stupid to think they are deprecated, old and a bad thing generally. Because of it, it's possible to create a really small distribution with full graphical desktop. Not to mention that there is a distribution for newbies that does not have any X at all. INX (INX is not X).

    It is never going to happen. Only way to achieve that is to make package format so good that everyone wants to use it.

    I declare this discussion old. It has been around for so long and it's just in vain. Not going to happen and we all know it.

  • OjM
    RE: Linux Desktop Wishlist
    [quote]Top on my list would be a rewrite of F-Spot in C++, like the rewrite of Tomboy (Gnote). That would mean I could remove mono completely from my system.[/quote] Yes, that should be the way to go. Less mono and more freedom. [quote]Second on my list would be an API that beats OpenGL and the usability of DirectX for things like games. Something that could be common across operating systems, easy to program for and encourage game developers to use for cost and ease of cross platformability (made up word).[/quote] Start developing it, I'd bet OpenGL people is trying their best. You also need to get hardware to recognice yourGL. [quote]I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on a core duo cpu @ > 2GHz and 2G of RAM. I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on 1/4 of that.[/quote] I had a computer with that 1/4 and it ran Gnome really well. I now have a laptop with C2D and 3G ram and Gnome flies. It doesn't use even that 1/4 of ram, so it does not matter if I have 1 or 3GB. If you are doing heavy compiling, rendering and such at the same time, it's not the fault of Gnome if it does not run well. Anyway, I have gone for Openbox and I'm looking for ways to go lighter with command-line tools. You want a lighter system? Build it or choose one. It helps nothing to whine that "I want this and I want that" when you do not bring anything new to the conversation. [quote]I'd like for people I've installed Linux for to be able to go to a website and download a program without knowing what distro they are running, what version of said distro, and whether it's 32 or 64 bit.[/quote] No you don't, you want them to "sudo apt-get install whatever" or to use the lovely add/remove program thingy. They should not install everything they find from the internet. That's what repositories are for. [quote]But there is one other thing on my wishlist (for now). I'd like to spend time writing programs and patching stuff for the Linux desktop rather than doing server stuff.[/quote] Yay! If you have things you'd like to change, just do it. It's good to scratch your personal itches first. I have some things I'd like to do and I'm actively learning how.
    Link to this post 14 May 09

    Top on my list would be a rewrite of F-Spot in C++, like the rewrite of Tomboy (Gnote). That would mean I could remove mono completely from my system.

    Yes, that should be the way to go. Less mono and more freedom.

    Second on my list would be an API that beats OpenGL and the usability of DirectX for things like games. Something that could be common across operating systems, easy to program for and encourage game developers to use for cost and ease of cross platformability (made up word).

    Start developing it, I'd bet OpenGL people is trying their best. You also need to get hardware to recognice yourGL.

    I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on a core duo cpu @ > 2GHz and 2G of RAM. I'd like Gnome to feel lightweight and responsive on 1/4 of that.

    I had a computer with that 1/4 and it ran Gnome really well. I now have a laptop with C2D and 3G ram and Gnome flies. It doesn't use even that 1/4 of ram, so it does not matter if I have 1 or 3GB.

    If you are doing heavy compiling, rendering and such at the same time, it's not the fault of Gnome if it does not run well. Anyway, I have gone for Openbox and I'm looking for ways to go lighter with command-line tools. You want a lighter system? Build it or choose one. It helps nothing to whine that "I want this and I want that" when you do not bring anything new to the conversation.

    I'd like for people I've installed Linux for to be able to go to a website and download a program without knowing what distro they are running, what version of said distro, and whether it's 32 or 64 bit.

    No you don't, you want them to "sudo apt-get install whatever" or to use the lovely add/remove program thingy. They should not install everything they find from the internet. That's what repositories are for.

    But there is one other thing on my wishlist (for now). I'd like to spend time writing programs and patching stuff for the Linux desktop rather than doing server stuff.

    Yay! If you have things you'd like to change, just do it. It's good to scratch your personal itches first. I have some things I'd like to do and I'm actively learning how.

  • OjM
    RE: I have no idea what Subject means in this context
    Well maybe, just maybe this isn't just trying to be a nerd facebook, but a serious community page for getting developers, companies and users together and stuff. I have no problem giving my information here, mostly because I think I can trust Linux Foundation. If I could not, I might be more paranoid about what lurks in Linux code and such, as the Foundation is providing things for the kernel hackers. I want to use this community page seriously, I study programming and I think I'd like to participate developing somethings. Also, the big boys like Eric Raymond think like this: "Concealing your identity behind a handle is a juvenile and silly behavior characteristic of crackers, warez d00dz, and other lower life forms. Hackers don't do this; they're proud of what they do and want it associated with their real names." People take you more seriously when you give your real name. Of course this place is also good for having fun, but it's not Facebook. This is not intended for trolling and posting silly things everywhere. Or playing pokemon with your friendslist. This site so does not suck, you just do not understand. //edit: You are a visitor, so you gave "This site sucks" as your name. It can be seen when replying. And the subject is of course the subject of your post.
    Link to this post 14 May 09

    Well maybe, just maybe this isn't just trying to be a nerd facebook, but a serious community page for getting developers, companies and users together and stuff.

    I have no problem giving my information here, mostly because I think I can trust Linux Foundation. If I could not, I might be more paranoid about what lurks in Linux code and such, as the Foundation is providing things for the kernel hackers.

    I want to use this community page seriously, I study programming and I think I'd like to participate developing somethings.

    Also, the big boys like Eric Raymond think like this: "Concealing your identity behind a handle is a juvenile and silly behavior characteristic of crackers, warez d00dz, and other lower life forms. Hackers don't do this; they're proud of what they do and want it associated with their real names."

    People take you more seriously when you give your real name.

    Of course this place is also good for having fun, but it's not Facebook. This is not intended for trolling and posting silly things everywhere. Or playing pokemon with your friendslist.

    This site so does not suck, you just do not understand.

    //edit: You are a visitor, so you gave "This site sucks" as your name. It can be seen when replying. And the subject is of course the subject of your post.

Who we are ?

The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to the growth of Linux.

More About the foundation...

Frequent Questions

Join / Linux Training / Board