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Creating Self-Signed SSL Certificates for Apache on Linux

If Firesheep and other menaces have you freaked out about using unsecured connections, it's time to take matters into your own hands. In just under 20 minutes, you can create a self-signed certificate for Apache to connect to your Web site for passing any kind of sensitive information. It's easy and takes very little time to configure.

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Block Unwanted Traffic With Packetfence

Packetfence is a very powerful Network Access Control tool. Using Packetfence you can control and block unwanted traffic on your network. Want to block P2P services like BitTorrent, or keep mobile devices like iPhones and Android phones off your wireless network? Packetfence gives you the kind of fine-grained control you're looking for.

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Weekend Project: Theming Your Linux Bootloader

These days, a lot of Linux users have one distro on their main machines and do everything they can to boot into a usable desktop as fast as possible. Those of us who dual-boot multiple distros — or even OSes — though, still have to stare at the bootloader screen for a few seconds every time we power-cycle. So why not put a new coat a paint on that tired, old text-based menu? Pull up a terminal, and we'll make booting something to look forward to.

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Creating and Reading eBooks on Linux with Calibre

Many of us are hoping for an eBook reader under the tree. A Kindle, a Nook, or perhaps just an Android device that runs eBook software. But if you don't get the gadget of your choice, or if you want to create content to fill one, you'll find plenty of eBook software for Linux as well as open source software to publish your own. The best of the lot? Calibre, a one stop solution for all your e-book needs.

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The Top Five Open Source Navigation Apps

Web browsers and messaging tools may grab the bulk of mobile software headlines, but navigation and routing apps are arguably more important — after all, they tend to be among the biggest data consumers, and a bad one can leave you seriously lost. Unfortunately, the default mapping apps on most mobile devices — even Linux-based phones — are usually proprietary and rely on commercially-licensed maps. If you care about software freedom and open data, here's a guide to the best mapping and navigation apps for handhelds.

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