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KDE 4.5: Your New Desktop Awaits

For the longest time I saw KDE as a distant third, or fourth, on the Linux desktop usability scale. For me, first came GNOME, then came Enlightenment E17, then came XFCE4, and then came KDE. This was a change from when KDE 3.5 — one of the most user-friendly desktops around. The KDE development team rolled out 4.0 and everything was turned on its head. KDE was no longer much use on the desktop, due to bugs, poor performance, and instability.

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MySQL 101: Working with the MySQL DB on Linux

Some people are born to be a database administrator, and others have database administration thrust upon them. If you're in the former group and you need to perform some very basic operations, like creating and backing up databases, you'll find it's much easier than it sounds. Let's take a look at some very basic MySQL administration to get started.

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Weekend Project: Accept OpenID Logins

OpenID is a critical piece of "Open Web" infrastructure. The ability to authenticate users without relying on a single gatekeeper entity puts every site on an equal playing field. As a result, community-driven, decentralized networks can enjoy all the same advantages as closed-source, proprietary players, and end users retain more of their autonomy and privacy. All of that sounds well and good, but it is not much use if you don't enable OpenID on the sites that you maintain. This weekend, why not add support for OpenID logins to your web service? You might be surprised how many LAMP and LAMP-like frameworks have a straightforward solution.

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Remote Administration with Linux

The next best thing to being there is being able to log into your systems remotely. One of the great things about Linux is the variety of tools you can use to remotely administer your Linux desktop and server systems. From the command line to GUI tools, you can take control of it all right from the comfort of your very own desktop anywhere you happen to be.

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Linuxables: Introduction to the Nano Text Editor

Welcome back to Linuxables, where Linux.com makes you very "able" to use Linux! We resume our series with my favorite text editor Nano. Nano is an ncurses-based editor (which means it must be run from a terminal window) that focuses on simplicity. Nano is a clone of the aging Pico text editor,  the editor for the Pine email client that was very popular, back in the early '90s, on UNIX and UNIX-like systems. Pine has now been replaced by Alpine and Pico by Nano, but some things haven't changed — like the simplicity of editing with Nano.

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