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Learn the main Linux OS components

Evolved from Unix, Linux provides users with a low-cost, secure way to manage their data center infrastructure. Due to its open source architecture, Linux can be tricky to learn and requires command-line interface knowledge as well as the expectation of inconsistent documentation.

In short, Linux is an OS. But Linux has some features and licensing options that set it apart from Microsoft and Apple OSes. To understand what Linux can do, it helps to understand the different Linux OS components and associated lingo.

Take a look at these terms to discover how the OS works and how it differs from Microsoft and Apple offerings.

[Source: TechTarget]

How to find what you’re looking for on Linux with find

There are a number of commands for finding files on Linux systems, but there are also a huge number of options that you can deploy when looking for them. For example, you can find files not just by their names, but by their owners and/or groups, their age, their size, the assigned permissions, the last time they were accessed, the associated inodes and even whether the files belong to an account or group that no longer exists on the system and so on.

You can also specify where a search should start, how deeply into the file system the search should reach and how much the search result will tell you about the files it finds. And all these criteria can be handled by the find command.

[Source: Network World]

Top 10 Most Used Open Source Software: Linux Foundation Report

Accounting for 80-90 percent of all software, Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) ecosystem is booming with high dependency usage by all sector companies. Accordingly, The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) in collaboration with Harvard’s Lab for Innovation Science has released a census report titled “Vulnerabilities in the Core, a Preliminary Report and Census II of Open Source Software.”

Concluding the survey, the latest census report focusses on the health and security of foss usage. The result is based on data provided by partner Software Composition Analysis (SCA) companies and other application security companies.

[Source: Fossbytes]

Pixel 5 surfaces in Android Open Source Project, hints at mid-range chip

Every year, it seems Pixel leak season begins just a little bit earlier, like the holiday shopping season but for smartphone nerds. We’ve already seen an alleged render of the upcoming Google flagship, and possible codenames for the Pixel 5 and 5 XL — Redfin and Bramble — have turned up. Now, a code change submitted to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) contained comments that directly mention the Pixel 5. As spotted by 9to5Google, an AOSP code change regarding Android’s Linux kernel includes a comment about testing the change on a Pixel 4 but not on a Pixel 5.

You can read the comment in full below: “Bounds sanitizer in arch/arm64/kernel/cpufeature.c makes image unbootable for Pixel 4 at 4.14 kernel. I didn’t have a chance to test it on Pixel 5 with 4.19, and preemptively disabling UBSan there now to ensure bootability.” (emphasis mine)

[Source: MobileSyrup]

GamePad: A New Open Source And 100% Linux-Dedicated Game Platform

Do you also believe that “Linux is not a gaming platform”? Well, it may not be the first priority of gamers. Still, if you look at the recent contribution by Linux community developers, Linux has improved a lot with support for graphics drivers and new games to provide a better gaming experience.

On that account, GamePad, a new entrant in the open game platform, launched a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter for its latest Linux gaming platform. Started in April 2019, GamePad is inspired by digital distribution platform, GOG (Good Old Games) for video games and films, to provide 100% Linux dedicated game platform.

[Source: Fossbytes]

Enterprise open source software is growing within innovative companies

Red Hat has been at the forefront of the global open source discussion, fighting for software freedom in the U.S Supreme Court, and offering free tech products for cloud infrastructure, automation, AI, and much more. After conducting research and interviewing IT leaders from around the world, Red Hat released a report examining the state of enterprise open source in 2020.

950 IT leaders, unaware that Red Hat was the research sponsor, were surveyed about their practices and opinions on enterprise open source software.

[Source: Jaxenter]

Amazon and commercial open source in the cloud: It’s complicated

Like many platform operators, Amazon has a love-hate relationship with those hosted on its platform. This is particularly true for open-source software creators, who see their products on offer on Amazon’s cloud on terms they are not happy with.

It’s a complicated relationship, which touches upon many aspects of technology, law, and social norms. The issue started becoming more pronounced and entering our turf on Big on Data, as Amazon Web Services (AWS) started offering top open-source data management products on its platform.

[Source: ZDNet]

Top 7 Anime Based Open-Source Projects

Anime is no longer limited only to Japan and China; it has gone global. It has attracted many people towards it because of its high-end graphics, vivid imaginations for the future, using highly advanced technologies which only find their place in our imaginations and artificial intelligence (AI) depiction in their storylines. Naturally, it serves as a means of entertainment for any kind of audience that watches it and also it could be fun to do projects related to it. And we all know Elon Musk likes anime too. Take a look at some of the popular kinds of open-source projects based on anime, have fun!

[Source: Analytics India Magazine]

How Kubernetes Became the Standard for Compute Resources

2019 has been a game-changing year for the cloud-native ecosystem. There were consolidations, acquisitions of powerhouses like Red Hat Docker and Pivotal, and the emergence of players like Rancher Labs and Mirantis.

“All these consolidation and M&A in this space is an indicator of how fast the market has matured,” said Sheng Liang, co-founder and CEO of Rancher Labs, a company that offers a complete software stack for teams adopting containers.

Traditionally, emerging technologies like Kubernetes and Docker appeal to tinkerers and mega-scalers such as Facebook and Google. There was very little interest outside of that group. However, both of these technologies experienced massive adoption at the enterprise level. Suddenly, there was a massive market with huge opportunities. Almost everyone jumped in. There were players who were bringing innovative solutions and then there were players who were trying to catch up with the rest. It became very crowded very quickly.

It also changed the way innovation was happening. Early adopters were usually tech-savvy companies. Now, almost everyone is using it, even in areas that were not considered turf for Kubernetes. It changed the market dynamics as companies like Rancher Labs were witnessing unique use cases.

Liang adds, “I’ve never been in a market or technology evolution that’s happened as quickly and as dynamically as Kubernetes. When we started some five years ago, it was a very crowded space. Over time, most of our peers disappeared for one reason or the other. Either they weren’t able to adjust to the change or they chose not to adjust to some of the changes.”

In the early days of Kubernetes, the most obvious opportunity was to build Kubernetes distro and Kubernetes operations. It’s new technology. It’s known to be reasonably complex to install, upgrade, and operate.

It all changed when Google, AWS, and Microsoft entered the market. At that point, there was a stampede of vendors rushing in to provide solutions for the platform. “As soon as cloud providers like Google decided to make Kubernetes as a service and offered it for free as loss-leader to drive infrastructure consumption, we knew that the business of actually operating and supporting Kubernetes, the upside of that would be very limited,” said Liang.

Not everything was bad for non-Google players. Since cloud vendors removed all the complexity that came with Kubernetes by offering it as a service, it meant wider adoption of the technology, even by those who refrained from using it due to the overhead of operating it. It meant that Kubernetes would become ubiquitous and would become an industry standard.

“Rancher Labs was one of the very few companies that saw this as an opportunity and looked one step further than everyone else. We realized that Kubernetes was going to become the new computing standard, just the way TCP/IP became the networking standard,” said Liang.

CNCF plays a critical role in building a vibrant ecosystem around Kubernetes, creating a massive community to build, nurture and commercialize cloud-native open source technologies.

Linux distro review: Intel’s own Clear Linux OS

Intel’s Clear Linux distribution has been getting a lot of attention lately, due to its incongruously high benchmark performance. Although the distribution was created and is managed by Intel, even AMD recommends running benchmarks of its new CPUs under Clear Linux in order to get the highest scores.

There’s not much question that Clear Linux is your best bet if you want to turn in the best possible benchmark numbers. The question not addressed here is, what’s it like to run Clear Linux as a daily driver? We were curious, so we took it for a spin.

[Source: Ars Technica]