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Open Source Collaboration is a Global Endeavor, Part 2

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The Linux Foundation would like to reiterate its statements and analysis of the application of US Export Control regulations to public, open collaboration projects (for example, open source software, open standards, open hardware, and open data) and the importance of open collaboration in the successful, global development of the world’s most important technologies.

Today’s announcement of prohibited transactions by the Department of Commerce regarding WeChat and TikTok in the United States confirms our initial impact analysis for open source collaboration. Nothing in the orders prevents or impacts our communities’ ability to openly collaborate with two valued members of our open source ecosystem, Tencent and ByteDance. From around the world, our members and participants engage in open collaboration because it is open and transparent, and those participants are clear that they desire to continue collaborating with their peers around the world.

As a reminder, we would like to point anyone with questions to our prior blog post on US export regulations, which links to our more detailed analysis of the topic. Both are available in English and Simplified Chinese for the convenience of our audiences.

The post Open Source Collaboration is a Global Endeavor, Part 2 appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Q&A: Unleashing the Beast—Bringing Linux to IBM Z

IBM has detailed the oral history of bringing Linux to the mainframe:

Two of the original team members from the IBM Böblingen Lab in Germany, Ingo Adlung and Boas Betzler, played crucial roles in bringing Linux to the IBM Z. Adlung is now Distinguished Engineer, Chief Architect & CTO, IBM Z, and LinuxONE Virtualization and Linux. Betzler is IBM Distinguished Engineer and Master Inventor. Here, they recall that work of 20 years ago.  

Read more at the IBM Newsroom

 

Online Bootcamps Provide Clear Onramp to Cloud Engineering Careers

Since launching the Cloud Engineer Bootcamp and Advanced Cloud Engineer Bootcamp, thousands of individuals have begun their journey to becoming a qualified, certified cloud engineer. These programs offer newbies and experienced IT professionals respectively the opportunity to gain the skills needed to launch their cloud career. With a recent D2IQ study finding “only 23% of organizations believe they have the talent required to successfully complete their cloud native journey”, now is the time to make a move into this rapidly growing space.

New, Free Training Course Explores How to Deploy a Microservice-Based Architecture Using the TARS Project

The Linux Foundation and The TARS Foundation have released a new, free training course, Building Microservice Platforms with TARS, on the edX platform. The course explains how to efficiently develop microservices programs using different programming languages and quickly deploy the corresponding services into applications. It also delves into the powerful functionalities of TARS – a high performance, open source RPC framework developed by Tencent as a full-fledged enterprise solution for microservice maintenance, development and operation – and the components that make up the TARS ecosystem.

IBM Contributes A2O Processor Core and PowerAI as Open Source at OpenPOWER Summit

Today at OpenPOWER Summit 2020, OpenPOWER Foundation announced two key technologies contributed by IBM to the open source community.

  • A2O POWER processor core, an out-of-order follow-up to the A2I core, and associated FPGA environment
  • Open Cognitive Environment (Open-CE), based on IBM’s PowerAI to enable improved consumability of AI and deep learning frameworks

The contributions follow the open sourcing of the POWER ISA and associated reference designs in August 2019 and the A2I POWER processor core in June 2020. They represent IBM’s continued commitment to fostering innovation around the POWER architecture from the OpenPOWER ecosystem.

Read more at the OpenPOWER Foundation blog

What’s new in the Linux kernel (HP enterprise.nxt)

Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols writes at HP enterprise.nxt

Linux runs pretty much everything: all 500 of the world’s 500 fastest supercomputers; most of the public cloud, even on Microsoft Azure; and 74 percent of smartphones. Indeed, thanks to Android, Linux is the most popular end-user operating system, nudging out Windows by 4 percent (39% vs. 35%).

So, where does Linux go next? After covering Linux for almost all 29 years of its history and knowing pretty much anyone who’s anyone in Linux development circles, up to and including Linus Torvalds, I think I have a clue.

Read more at HP enterprise.nxt

Where’s the Yelp for open-source tools? (Functionize)

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols writes at Functionize:

We’d like an easy way to judge open-source programs. It can be done. But easily? That’s another matter. When it comes to open source, you can’t rely on star power.

The “wisdom of the crowd” has inspired all sorts of online services wherein people share their opinions and guide others in making choices. The Internet community has created many ways to do this, such as Amazon reviews, Glassdoor (where you can rate employers), and TripAdvisor and Yelp (for hotels, restaurants, and other service providers). You can rate or recommend commercial software, too, such as on mobile app stores or through sites like product hunt. But if you want advice to help you choose open-source applications, the results are disappointing.

It isn’t for lack of trying. Plenty of people have created systems to collect, judge, and evaluate open-source projects, including information about a project’s popularity, reliability, and activity. But each of those review sites – and their methodologies – have flaws.

Read more at Functionize

Linux Certifications: 4 Things You Need to Know About Obtaining Them

The rise of open cloud platforms is fostering a rise in demand for Linux specialists equipped with the right expertise. In this new environment, obtaining a Linux certification can boost your career by proving your skills in increasingly critical areas.

With the vast majority of Amazon servers running Linux, and many servers running open-source software, Linux is, in the eyes of many, the de facto OS of the cloud. No wonder sysadmins, systems engineers, and system administrators with Linux skills can earn a healthy salary premium. 

Source: Dice Insights

New, Free Training Course Teaches Fundamentals of Serverless on Kubernetes

The Linux Foundation and Cloud Native Computing Foundation have released a new, free training course, Introduction to Serverless on Kubernetes, on the edX platform. The course explains how to build serverless functions that can run on any cloud, without being restricted by limits on the execution duration, languages available, or the size of your code. It is designed to provide an overview of how a serverless approach works in tandem with a Kubernetes cluster.