May 23, 2013

How can I dual boot two or more Linux distros?

I've been playing around with a few live CD/DVDs of different distros. This includes most of the Mint stable, Ubuntu 13.04, (unimpressed), Kubuntu 13.04, PinguyOS 12.04 and Debian 7.0 I would very much like to install Linux Mint 15 and Debian 7 as a dual boot system. Linux Mint 15 Cinnamon is stunning and I want it as my primary OS. While Debian 7.0 is a steady old carthorse that is reliable, comparatively unsophisticated and very powerful. Good for me as a relative noob to activate the grey matter and learn about the workings of Linux. You now know what I would like to do. I big question is how do I do it. It will be a clean install on a HP Laptop, Intel dual core 2Ghz processor on a 160Gbyte hard drive. I'm coming from the Mac and Windows environment and I'm sick of both of them. Any help will be much appreciated.

Sounds like the older model of HP laptop will not give issues with UEFI, so...

Sounds like the older model of HP laptop will not give issues with UEFI, so should be a fairly simple process. The last one installed will be the default system in GRUB, so install Debian first, then Mint 15. Probably best to partition the hard drive into equal sizes unless you expect to install more programs in one over the other. Boot your live DVD's and go for the install options on each. If you screw up, just start over. I recently installed four different distros on to a 320 GB hard drive (80 GB each) and they all worked fine. If you want to get your feet wet, wade into the pool. ;-)

Like  (6 likes)

Sounds like the older model of HP laptop will not give issues with UEFI, so...

Sounds like the older model of HP laptop will not give issues with UEFI, so should be a fairly simple process. The last one installed will be the default system in GRUB, so install Debian first, then Mint 15. Probably best to partition the hard drive into equal sizes unless you expect to install more programs in one over the other. Boot your live DVD's and go for the install options on each. If you screw up, just start over. I recently installed four different distros on to a 320 GB hard drive (80 GB each) and they all worked fine. If you want to get your feet wet, wade into the pool. ;-)

Like  (6 likes)

Sounds like the older model of HP laptop will not give issues with UEFI, so...

Sounds like the older model of HP laptop will not give issues with UEFI, so should be a fairly simple process. The last one installed will be the default system in GRUB, so install Debian first, then Mint 15. Probably best to partition the hard drive into equal sizes unless you expect to install more programs in one over the other. Boot your live DVD's and go for the install options on each. If you screw up, just start over. I recently installed four different distros on to a 320 GB hard drive (80 GB each) and they all worked fine. If you want to get your feet wet, wade into the pool. ;-)

Like  (6 likes)

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task....

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task. First, take either OS and make a complete, full install. (So that that distro takes up all disk space.) Then just install your second OS, but this time during the boot process just select how much space you want the second OS to have. After that, you have a dual boot system. You will now be able to select either distro in GRUB during boot up.

Easy right? Hope this helps.
Izzy

Like  (28 likes)

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task....

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task. First, take either OS and make a complete, full install. (So that that distro takes up all disk space.) Then just install your second OS, but this time during the boot process just select how much space you want the second OS to have. After that, you have a dual boot system. You will now be able to select either distro in GRUB during boot up.

Easy right? Hope this helps.
Izzy

Like  (28 likes)

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task....

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task. First, take either OS and make a complete, full install. (So that that distro takes up all disk space.) Then just install your second OS, but this time during the boot process just select how much space you want the second OS to have. After that, you have a dual boot system. You will now be able to select either distro in GRUB during boot up.

Easy right? Hope this helps.
Izzy

Like  (28 likes)

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task....

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task. First, take either OS and make a complete, full install. (So that that distro takes up all disk space.) Then just install your second OS, but this time during the boot process just select how much space you want the second OS to have. After that, you have a dual boot system. You will now be able to select either distro in GRUB during boot up.

Easy right? Hope this helps.
Izzy

Like  (28 likes)

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task....

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task. First, take either OS and make a complete, full install. (So that that distro takes up all disk space.) Then just install your second OS, but this time during the boot process just select how much space you want the second OS to have. After that, you have a dual boot system. You will now be able to select either distro in GRUB during boot up.

Easy right? Hope this helps.
Izzy

Like  (28 likes)

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task....

Don't worry, dual booting Linux distros is a mind numbingly simple task. First, take either OS and make a complete, full install. (So that that distro takes up all disk space.) Then just install your second OS, but this time during the boot process just select how much space you want the second OS to have. After that, you have a dual boot system. You will now be able to select either distro in GRUB during boot up.

Easy right? Hope this helps.
Izzy

Like  (28 likes)
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