May 31, 2002

Open Source software may offer target for terrorists

There really is a war going on, against Open Source. The powers that be in Corporate America are not ready for advances in technology combined with the collaborative spirit of today's true development community. According to the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution: "Terrorists trying to hack or disrupt U.S. computer networks might find it easier if the federal
government attempts to switch to "open source" as some groups propose."
WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 30, 2002--Terrorists trying to hack or disrupt U.S. computer networks might find it easier if the federal
government attempts to switch to "open source" as some groups propose.

"Opening the Open Source Debate", a soon to be released white paper by Alexis de Tocqueville Institution details the complex issues surrounding
open source, particularly if federal agencies such as the Department of Defense or the Federal Aviation Administration use software that inherently
requires that its blueprints, source code and architecture is made widely available to any person interested - without discretion.

In a paper to be released next week, the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution outlines how open source might facilitate efforts to disrupt or sabotage
electronic commerce, air traffic control or even sensitive surveillance systems.

Unlike proprietary software, open source software does not make the underlying code of a software confidential.
"Computer systems are the backbone to U.S. national security", says Fossedal, chairman of the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution and its Committee
for the Common Defense, which will release the study. "Before the Pentagon and other federal agencies make uninformed decision to alter the very
foundation of computer security, they should study the potential consequences carefully."

--30--rlg/ny*

CONTACT: Alexis de Tocqueville Institution
Ken Brown, 202/548-0006
kenbrown@adti.net
www.adti.net

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