September 2, 2014

Revisiting How We Put Together Linux Systems

In a previous blog story I discussed Factory Reset, Stateless Systems, Reproducible Systems & Verifiable Systems, I now want to take the opportunity to explain a bit where we want to take this with systemd in the longer run, and what we want to build out of it. This is going to be a longer story, so better grab a cold bottle of Club Mate before you start reading.

Traditional Linux distributions are built around packaging systems like RPM or dpkg, and an organization model where upstream developers and downstream packagers are relatively clearly separated: an upstream developer writes code, and puts it somewhere online, in a tarball. A packager than grabs it and turns it into RPMs/DEBs. The user then grabs these RPMs/DEBs and installs them locally on the system. For a variety of uses this is a fantastic scheme: users have a large selection of readily packaged software available, in mostly uniform packaging, from a single source they can trust. In this scheme the distribution vets all software it packages, and as long as the user trusts the distribution all should be good. The distribution takes the responsibility of ensuring the software is not malicious, of timely fixing security problems and helping the user if something is wrong.

Read more at Lennart Poettering's blog.

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