April 23, 2001

Tuesday 24 April 2001: Marconi forum on Internet privacy

Author: JT Smith

"Web users want assurances that their communications or e-commerce will
remain private without having to worry that their ideas, or even their
identities, are stolen and every detail of their lives will be laid bare
while others profit from personal data collection."
Tuesday 24 April 2001: Marconi Forum on Internet Privacy
From: secretary@lxny.org
To: editors@newsforge.com
Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2001 04:09:57 -0400


This meeting starts at 4:00 pm on the Columbia campus.

This meeting is free and open to the public.

This meeting is important.

Official notice below.

Jay Sulzberger 
Corresponding Secretary LXNY
LXNY is New York's Free Computing Organization.
http://www.lxny.org


> Date: 4 Apr 2001 13:33:27 -0400
> Organization: Columbia University Department of Computer Science
> Message-ID:
> Reply-To: theory-group-request@cs.columbia.edu

2001 Marconi Forum on Internet Privacy
Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Privacy Under Assault: Can Encryption Safeguard the Internet?

Tuesday, April 24, 2001
International Marconi Day
4-6 p.m.
Reception to follow
Davis Auditorium of the Schapiro Center
for Engineering and Physcical Science Research
Columbia University
New York, N.Y.

Web users want assurances that their communications or e-commerce will
remain private without having to worry that their ideas, or even their
identities, are stolen and every detail of their lives will be laid bare
while others profit from personal data collection.

Digital threats arise from all quarters, including corporations and
marketing firms, potential employers and credit agencies, health and
government establishments, as well as outright snoopers and
opportunists. Can improved technologies protect privacy on the Internet or
is privacy a casualty of the digital age?

The Marconi Forum brings together leading figures from technology,
government, journalism, business and law to examine how-- or whether-- our
right to privacy can be secured from digital incursions.

Participants are :

Zvi Galil, Moderator
Dean, Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science
expert on encryption

Whitfield Diffie
Distinguished Engineer, Sun Microsystems
co-inventor, public key cryptography
2000 Marconi Fellow

Michael Rabin
Professor of Computer Science
Harvard University
developed code based on "vanishing" key

John Podesta
White House Chief of Staff
Clinton Administration
Visiting Professor of Law, Georgetown University
Law Center

Steven Levy
Author, Crypto, Spring 2001
Senior Editor, Technology, Newsweek

Shari Steele
Excutive Director
Electronic Privacy Association
advocate for civil liberties in online world

Eli Noam
Professor, Columbia Business School
Director, Columbia Institute for
for Tele-information
authority on telecommunications strategy
and policy

Sponsored by the Marconi Foundation, The Fu Foundation
School of Engineering and Applied Science
Columbia University

in collaboration with
The Center for New Media, Columbia Graduate School
of Journalism

Columbia Institute for Tele-Information,
Columbia Business School

Click Here!