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Happy SysAdmin Day! Save $100 on All Products – Plus a Free Gift

We love our SysAdmins at The Linux Foundation! You are the ones who keep so much of the technology we rely on running smoothly so we can all do our jobs. That’s why we want to recognize you with a special offer ahead of SysAdmin Day on July 30.

From now through July 30, 2021, everyone can save $100 on any of our products, simply by using code SYSADMIN100 at checkout. That means you can get the training or certification you’ve been considering at a significant discount, helping to improve your skills and credentials with products like:

Essentials of Linux System Administration (LFS201)
Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS)
Linux Networking & Administration (LFS211)
Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE)

With the most recent Open Source Jobs Report finding 93% of hiring managers are having difficulty finding enough open source talent, and 57% prioritizing hiring of certified professionals, this is a great time to learn a new skill. If you aren’t sure what to pursue, that’s ok! Check out our Plan Your Training page to view learning paths, or take our Career Path Quiz to figure out which area of technology best fits your interests and personality.

If you already know what you want to study, head straight to our product catalog and get started!

The post Happy SysAdmin Day! Save $100 on All Products – Plus a Free Gift appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

The 5 things I wish I’d known before becoming a sysadmin

Being an IT professional, you know that information is important. Here are five bits of information I wish I’d known before signing on the dotted line as a sysadmin.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021

Premier event for open source developers and community will feature visionaries sharing insights on Machine Learning, Security, Linux, Gaming, Cloud, the Mars Ingenuity Mission and more.

SAN FRANCISCO, July 15, 2021The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021, taking place September 27-30 in Seattle, Washington. The events are being produced in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual participation available, and are co-located with OSPOCon and Linux Security Summit, among others.

Open Source Summit (OSS) is the leading conference for developers, architects and other technologists – as well as open source community and industry leaders – to collaborate, share information, learn about the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions. Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is the leading, vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded and industrial IoT products. Over 4,000 are expected to participate in the event. 

Keynote speakers include:

Anima Anandkumar, Bren Professor of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) & Director, Machine Learning Research, NVIDIA, sharing on machine learning.

Tim Canham, Software and Operations Lead for the Mars Helicopter, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, discussing the use of Linux in the Mars Ingenuity mission.

Hilary Carter, Vice President of Research, and Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation, sharing insights on new initiatives at The Linux Foundation for the open source community.

Chris DiBona, Director of Open Source & Making and Science, Google

Heather E. McGowan, Future of Work Strategist, speaking on the future of work and the human capital era.

Todd Moore, Vice President – Open Technology and Developer Advocacy & Chief Technology Officer, DEG, IBM

Royal O’Brien, Game Tech Chief Evangelist, Amazon, speaking on the new Open 3D Engine Foundation.

Sanath Kumar Ramesh, Founder & Chief Executive Officer, OpenTreatments Foundation, sharing on OpenTreatment’s life-altering
initiative.

Brent Schroeder, Head of Office of CTO, Americas Chief Technology Officer, SUSE

Window Snyder, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Thistle Technologies, discussing IoT security.

Kate Stewart, Vice President of Dependable Embedded Systems and Dr. David A. Wheeler, Director of Open Source Supply Chain Security, The Linux Foundation, speaking on supply chain security.

Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux & Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, Vice President & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware, discussing 30 years of Linux.

Chris Wright, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Red Hat

The full schedule of sessions will be announced on July 22, with additional keynotes also being announced in the coming weeks. 

Registration (in-person) is offered at the early price of $850 through July 27. Registration to attend virtually is $50. Members of The Linux Foundation receive a 20 percent discount off registration and can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted. For information on eligibility and how to apply, please click here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. To learn more and apply, please click here.

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Sponsor
Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 is made possible thanks to our sponsors, including Diamond Sponsors: Google, IBM, Microsoft and Red Hat, Platinum Sponsors: Huawei, Snyk, and SUSE, and Gold Sponsors: SODA Foundation, Styra, WhiteSource and Witekio. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team.

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post The Linux Foundation Announces Keynote Speakers for Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021 appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Understanding US Export Controls and Open Source Projects (2021 Update)

One of the greatest strengths of open source development is how it enables collaboration across the entire world. However, because open source development is a global activity, it necessarily involves making available software across national boundaries. Some countries’ export control regulations, such as the United States, may require taking additional steps to ensure that an open source project is satisfying obligations under local laws.

In July of 2020, The Linux Foundation published a whitepaper on how to address these issues in detail, which can be downloaded here. In 2021, the primary update in the paper is to reflect a change in the US Export Administration Regulations.

Previously, in order for publicly available encryption software under ECCN 5D002 to be not subject to the EAR, email notifications were required regardless of whether or not the cryptography it implemented was standardized.Following the change, email notifications are only required for software that implements “non-standard cryptography”.

Please see the updated paper and the EAR for more specific details about this change.

The post Understanding US Export Controls and Open Source Projects (2021 Update) appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Understanding US export controls with open source projects (2021)

One of the greatest strengths of open source development is how it enables collaboration across the entire world. However, because open source development is a global activity, it necessarily involves making available software across national boundaries. Some countries’ export control regulations, such as the United States, may require taking additional steps to ensure that an open source project is satisfying obligations under local laws.

In July of 2020, The Linux Foundation published a whitepaper on how to address these issues in detail, which can be downloaded here. In 2021, the primary update in the paper is to reflect a change in the US Export Administration Regulations.

Previously, in order for publicly available encryption software under ECCN 5D002 to be not subject to the EAR, email notifications were required regardless of whether or not the cryptography it implemented was standardized.Following the change, email notifications are only required for software that implements “non-standard cryptography”.

Please see the updated paper and the EAR for more specific details about this change.

The post Understanding US export controls with open source projects (2021) appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Linux Foundation Launches 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey

Linux Foundation Launches 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey

In partnership with AWS, CHAOSS, Comcast, Fujitsu, GitHub, GitLab, Hitachi, Huawei, Intel, NEC, Panasonic, Renesas, Panasonic, RedHat, VMware

Linux Foundation Research and its partners are assessing the state of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) within open source communities. The purpose of this research is to understand the demographics and dynamics concerning overall contributor participation and to identify gaps to be addressed as a means to advancing inclusive cultures within these environments.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion are core values of the Linux Foundation, and we are constantly looking for ways to improve our communities for the benefit of their contributors. Our initiatives include DEI efforts across our global events, training, and open source member programs. For example, we founded the Inclusive Naming Initiative (November 2020) with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, and we began awarding training scholarships with TransTech (Spring 2021) for qualified LGBTQ individuals.

This research aims to drive data-driven decisions on future programming and interventions to benefit the people who use and develop open source technologies. The survey results will enable greater understanding of the people who use and develop open source technologies within the Linux Foundation and its partner communities.

To take the survey in Russian, Chinese (simplified), Japanese, Korean, Hindi, Arabic, German, French, Spanish, or Portuguese (Br), click on the upper right-hand corner on the survey landing page.

Open source software is created by people of vastly different backgrounds, nationalities, orientations, and identities — all of whose opinions must be respected, included, and recognized. As the leader in running the world’s most important open source communities, it is incumbent upon us to elevate those opinions and concerns regarding important DEI issues with quantifiable data.

Jim Zemlin
Executive Director, Linux Foundation

We are pleased to have the support of several members of the LF community in this research. Hear from those supporters who have offered comments:

In today’s digital world, open source software powers nearly all of our modern society and economy. Understanding the people who build, maintain, and use these projects is important to anyone concerned about the sustainability of open source and the critical network of services and technologies that depend on it. As the home to over 65 million developers, we are proud to join The Linux Foundation in the 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey.

Demetris CheathamSr. Director, Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Strategy, GitHub

Building an environment where everyone feels a sense of belonging is not just the right thing to do; it’s also good for business. Our Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging (DIB) values have been fundamental to GitLab’s success, in which we collaborate alongside our open source community to build a product that best represents our estimated 30 million users. When thinking about a DIB strategy, plan, or philosophy, you have to consider all the things you can’t see, and you don’t hear. For that reason, we have joined the Linux Foundation to launch the 2021 Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey, and we look forward to hearing the voices of the wider open source community. Together, we’ll uncover insights that we hope will lead to a lasting impact across the entire open source ecosystem.

Candace WilliamsManager, Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging, GitLab

Creating an open and inclusive community for all people is a great mission to have, and underpinning this is data on where we are and what is needed to achieve the mission.  I am proud to support this groundbreaking work being done by the Linux Foundation to get a baseline of where we are in including all people in our open source communities and keeping this data and questions open and ensuring people’s privacy.

Nithya A. RuffHead, Comcast Open Source Program Office, Comcast

CHAOSS was honored to be a core contributor to the creation of this survey, and watching it evolve as part of a collaboration of a diverse and experienced team was an amazing process. We fully support this initiative, as the results of this survey will be crucial for many of us working to help others improve the health of their open source projects.

Elizabeth BarronCommunity Manager, CHAOSS

Open Source has become critically fundamental for today’s ICT infrastructure. Its sustainability relies on the developers and users, many of whom have very diverse backgrounds and opinions. The LF Research DEI Survey will provide key insights into these different aspects of our open source communities. As one of the active open source users and contributors, Huawei is happy to support this research and hopes this will help open source, the greatest collaborative development in human history, to achieve a more bright and sustainable future.

Peixin HouChief Open Source Expert, Huawei

Our best is achieved when work environments are as supportive, inclusive, and diverse as they are innovative. Through new insights about both the people who are the open source community, and their work cultures, we can understand shortcomings and work toward that vision. Intel is proud to support the Linux Foundation’s diversity, equity, and inclusion research as part of its broad commitment to creating innovative environments through diverse teams.

Melissa E. EversVice President, Architecture, Graphics and Software, Software and Ecosystem Strategy, Intel

Open and inclusive communities and ecosystems are at the heart of innovation for Red Hat. Diversity and equity are key to organizational health, and we’re hopeful this important research will increase awareness and opportunities for underrepresented groups, introduce new perspectives and ideas, and inform plans to create more welcoming communities.

Deborah BryantSenior Director, OPSO, Office of the CTO, Red Hat

Renesas fully supports the Linux Foundation’s effort to better understand open source community participation and desire to make the community more inclusive for users and contributors. We consider Diversity and Inclusion as part of our core values and applaud the Linux Foundation for striving to advance a culture of inclusion across the open source ecosystem.

Hisao MunakataSenior Director, Renesas

VMware sees it as critical that we create a digital future that is equitable, accessible, and inclusive for all. We are proud to align ourselves with open source communities like the Linux Foundation and do our part to help build a culture of inclusion across the tech industry. Together, we can enable everyone, regardless of background, to succeed and further innovation.

Shanis WindlandVice President of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, VMware

Survey Details

This survey will take 15 minutes or less. It will be used to create an anonymized data set, with non-sensitive portions made freely available where feasible to do so and will avoid re-identification of respondents.

Anyone who uses, contributes to, or thinks about open source software is welcome to participate in the survey. Whether you’re a long-time maintainer, a new contributor, or if you are an open source-curious person, we want to hear from you!

Bonus

As a thank-you for your participation, you will receive a 20% registration discount to attend the Open Source Summit/Embedded Linux Conference event upon completion of the survey. Please note this discount is not transferable and may not be combined with other offers.

Privacy

All questions are optional. The data collected here is anonymous and will not be linked to any other data sources. Please do not include any details that could reasonably identify you or any other person in text responses. We aim not to collect any personally identifying information, and the privacy and confidentiality of all respondents will be maintained; please see https://www.linuxfoundation.org/resources/publications/useaccess/ for more information about the Use and Access Policy for the responses to this survey. This survey uses cookies, but only to prevent duplicate responses. 

References

Questions used in this survey draw from the work of:

Open Demographics Documentation
Diversity in Tech
The CHAOSS Project
GitHub 2017 Open Source Survey

The questions in this survey are made available and may be reused under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike 4.0 International (CC-BY-SA-4.0). The CC-BY-SA-4.0 license is available at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/.

Thank You

Linux Foundation Research and our partners are grateful for the contributions of a dedicated group of individuals, all of whom have contributed their time and talents toward the development of this survey.

Questions

If you have questions regarding this survey, please email us at research@linuxfoundation.org.

The post Linux Foundation Launches 2021 Open Source Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Survey appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Linux GECOS information demystified

If you ever wanted to know what GECOS is and why it’s important to you, here are the answers
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

Tales from the field: A system administrator’s guide to IT automation

Download this collection of short stories about the excitement, frustrations, and challenges associated with learning IT automation.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

How LFCA Compares to Legacy Entry-Level IT Certifications

When we developed the Linux Foundation Certified IT Associate (LFCA) exam, we wanted to create a certification that would help folks get started in an IT career by demonstrating to employers they possess knowledge of the most important and widely used modern infrastructure technologies. Our goal was to make an IT career more accessible, and also close the skills gap that is making it difficult for employers to find enough talented candidates.

Part of this process involved looking at the existing marketplace for entry-level IT certifications, and seeing where they were lacking. For instance, the 2020 Open Source Jobs Report from The Linux Foundation and edX found that knowledge of cloud computing has the biggest impact on hiring decisions amongst employers; but legacy entry-level IT certifications do not test for cloud computing knowledge. 

The new chart below compares the LFCA exam to a typical legacy entry-level IT certification to outline the differences, and highlight why LFCA is becoming the certification of choice for employers who want to hire new talent with the knowledge necessary to get straight to work administering modern IT infrastructure. We encourage you to check it out, and also our IT career roadmap which explores some of the career paths that the LFCA can open. 

And remember to celebrate 30 years of Linux in 2021, the LFCA exam is discounted 30% through December 31 if you use code LINUX30 at checkout!

Download Full Version

The post How LFCA Compares to Legacy Entry-Level IT Certifications appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

What’s the average age of a Linux sysadmin?

This poll attempts to answer a question posed by one of our community members
Read More at Enable Sysadmin