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Time management: must-have tools and strategies for sysadmins

Learn to be intentional about planning out your daily tasks and remember to leave time for yourself, your family, and your friends.
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Linux for beginners: 10 more commands for manipulating files

Check out these ten additional commands from a sysadmin to help you learn Linux at the command line.
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How to read and correct SELinux denial messages

A look at SELinux denial messages, where they’re logged, and how to parse them.
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The value of sysadmin to sysadmin mentorship

Mentors might expose your weaknesses, but they will also provide you with opportunities to improve.
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Container image short names in Podman

Container image short names in Podman

This new feature, pulling images with Podman by using short names, includes more security, greater convenience, and is another step forward for container management.
Valentin Rothberg
Mon, 11/2/2020 at 9:26pm

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Image by monicore from Pixabay

Linux Containers

Topics:  
Containers  
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October 2020 top 10 sysadmin how-tos and tutorials

October 2020 top 10 sysadmin how-tos and tutorials

Take a look back at our spookiest month yet.
tcarriga
Mon, 11/2/2020 at 5:54pm

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Photo by Ylanite Koppens from Pexels

October 2020 was a collosal month here at Enable Sysadmin. We smashed every record previously set with some very impressive numbers. We published 36 articles from 22 different authors, earning north of 429k pageviews and 312k unique visitors.

We covered a vast array of technologies and interest areas; from command line tips and tricks, YAML, systemctl, and ssh, to Linux/Windows collaborations and sysadmin career advice. We are confident that you will find something of interest to you.
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An open guide to evaluating software composition analysis tools

Overview

With the help of software composition analysis (SCA) tools, software development teams can track and analyze any open source code brought into a project from a licensing compliance and security vulnerabilities perspective. Such tools discover open source code (at various levels of details and capabilities), their direct and indirect dependencies, licenses in effect, and the presence of any known security vulnerabilities and potential exploits. Several companies provide SCA suites, open source tools, and related services driven as community projects. The question of what tool is most suitable for a specific usage model and environment always comes up. It is difficult to answer given the lack of a standard method to compare and evaluate such tools.

The goal of this paper is to recommend a series of comparative metrics when evaluating multiple SCA tools.

The post An open guide to evaluating software composition analysis tools appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

An open guide to evaluating software composition analysis tools

Overview

With the help of software composition analysis (SCA) tools, software development teams can track and analyze any open source code brought into a project from a licensing compliance and security vulnerabilities perspective. Such tools discover open source code (at various levels of details and capabilities), their direct and indirect dependencies, licenses in effect, and the presence of any known security vulnerabilities and potential exploits. Several companies provide SCA suites, open source tools, and related services driven as community projects. The question of what tool is most suitable for a specific usage model and environment always comes up. It is difficult to answer given the lack of a standard method to compare and evaluate such tools. 

The goal of this paper is to recommend a series of comparative metrics when evaluating multiple SCA tools. 

The post An open guide to evaluating software composition analysis tools appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

How to Build a Highly Qualified Cloud-Native Team

If you’re reading this, you more than likely are aware of the struggles involved in recruiting and building a team of technical professionals skilled in cloud-native computing technologies such as Kubernetes, Helm, Prometheus, and service mesh. The Linux Foundation and edX’s “2020 Open Source Jobs Report” found 93% of hiring managers are having difficulties filling open positions that require open source skills like these. The report also found that cloud and container technologies are the most in-demand aside from Linux, which itself is a necessary basic skill for cloud professionals.

So the question is, between a talent shortage and rapidly increasing adoption of these technologies, how can any leader manage to build out a qualified team? Based on our experiences as a vendor-neutral provider of training and certification for many of these technologies, we’ve learned some tips and tricks that, with some effort, can help you establish a team that can handle any cloud-native project you throw at them.

Read more: DevOps.com

Linux and open source jobs are in high demand

Linux and open-source jobs are hotter than ever
The Linux Foundation and edX, the leading online course company, released the 2020 Open Source Jobs Report on October 26. Once again, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, the demand for open-source technology skills is growing. 37% of hiring managers say they will hire more IT professionals in the next six months.
Read more: ZDNet
Open source jobs are in high demand, but wait–what’s an open source professional?
Commentary: A new Linux Foundation report suggests it’s a great time to be an open source professional. Matt Asay argues that an open source professional is no one and almost everyone.
Read more: TechRepublic