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How I went through burnout and came out stronger

There are many causes of job burnout. Learning to identify the signals and make changes early is the best way to avoid catastrophic failure.
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How to handle complex dated and timed tasks in Bash

Dealing with dates and times can be challenging, but there are plenty of tools to help you in your coding tasks.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

Expanded Keynote Line-Up for Open Networking and Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day Includes Industry Luminaries

Four additional keynotes speakers will grace the main stage at Open Networking and Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day to share expertise across Automation and AI, 5G, and the power of Open Ecosystems 

SAN FRANCISCO, August 18, 2021The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-hosts LF Edge, LF Networking, and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), ​​today announced four top keynote speakers for Open Networking and Edge (ONE) Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day, taking place October 11-12 in Los Angeles, Calif. The events will be produced in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual participation available, and are co-located with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America (October 11-15). 

ONE Summit  is the industry’s premier open networking & edge computing event gathering developers, architects and business leaders across enterprises, government, global services providers and cloud for education, inspiration and collaboration. This year, it is joined by Kubernetes on Edge Day which gathers developers and adopters to share their lessons learned in building, breaking, and bettering their edge infrastructure on top of Kubernetes.

“I am especially eager to learn from our newest confirmed keynote speakers, who represent not only the diversity of our community, but the diversity of expertise across the space,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge, and IoT, The Linux Foundation. “Join us either in-person or virtually to learn from some of the best and brightest innovators.”

With an extensive program of 80+ talks, ONE Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day will cover the latest trends across networking & edge across business & technical sessions. Conference tracks include: Enterprise Networking & Edge; Cloud Networking & Edge; Kubernetes on Edge; The New Service Provider (Open Core, Unified Edge & Universal Access); and Business Critical & Innovation.

New Keynote speakers:

Dr. Junlan Feng, Chief Scientist & General Manager, China Mobile Research. Dr. Feng also chairs the LF Networking Governing Board. Her presentation will focus on Network Automation and AIJennifer Kyriakakis, Founder & VP Marketing, MATRIXX Software. Ms. Kyriakakis’ session will focus on Making 5G Real Leveraging Open SourceVanessa Little, Global CTO, Interdynamix (IDX). Ms. Little will speak about Challenges & Innovation in Integration of Open Ecosystem Amy Zwarico, Director – Cybersecurity, Chief Security Office, AT&T. Ms. Zwarico will participate on a keynote panel, “Security across Cloud, Telecom and Edge – in an open world”

Registration

Registration (in-person) is offered at the standard price of US$1125 through September 20. In-Person Academic and Hobbyist Passes are available for US$575 and Student Passes for US$275. Registration to attend virtually is US$50 for all attendee types. Given the current COVID pandemic, all registration funds are fully refundable up until the day before the event.

Members of The Linux Foundation, LF Networking, LF Edge and CNCF receive a 20 percent discount off registration and can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. 

Attendees looking to attend ONE Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day and KubeCon + CloudNativeCon can register for all events through the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon registration form and add their ONE Summit registration at a discounted rate (US$599 for Corporate or US$399 for Individual or Academic).

Health and Safety

In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. Note, in-person registrations are 100 percent refundable until October 10, 2021. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post

Sponsor

Open Networking & Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day is made possible thanks to our sponsors, including Diamond Sponsors: Intel and Juniper Networks, Platinum Sponsors: Huawei, IBM and Zededa, and Gold Sponsor: Cloud Native Computing Foundation. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email  for more information and to speak to the team.

Press & Analysts

Members of the press and analyst communities who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Jill Lovato. 

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact

Jill Lovato

The Linux Foundationjlovato@linuxfoundation.org

The post Expanded Keynote Line-Up for Open Networking and Edge Summit + Kubernetes on Edge Day Includes Industry Luminaries appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group Announce the Schedule for OSPOCon Europe 2021, Oct 6

OSPOCon, held in North America and Europe this year, is a new event dedicated to creating better, more efficient open source ecosystems, covering the creation and best practices of open source program offices (OSPOs), open source corporate sustainability, and much more.

SAN FRANCISCO, August 18, 2021 —  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-host the TODO Group, an open group of organizations who collaborate on practices, tools and other ways to run successful and effective open source programs and projects, today announced the conference agenda for OSPOCon Europe 2021. The event takes place October 6 in London, England. The schedule can be viewed here

Open Source Program Offices (OSPOs) face many obstacles, such as ensuring high-quality and frequent releases, engaging with developer communities, and contributing back to other projects effectively. OSPOCon events will empower the collaboration of those working to create a center of competency for open source in their organizations through sharing experiences, best practices and tooling. 

OSPOCon Europe session highlights include:

What TODO in the EU: Updates from the TODO Group European Chapter – Leslie Hawthorn, Red Hat & Alexios Zavras, Intel
Innersource: The Key to Your OSPO’s Success – John Mark Walker, Fannie Mae
Exploring OSPOs and Open Methods in Humanitarian Response – Heather Leson, Solferino Academy, & International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies & Peter Masters, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
Good Governance Practices for Healthy Open Source Projects – Dawn Foster, VMware

In addition to OSPOCon Europe, OSPOCon North America is being held September 27-29 in Seattle, Washington alongside Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021. To view the schedule, click here. These events are being produced in a hybrid format, with both in-person and virtual participation available. To learn more, click here

Registration
Registration is offered at the early price of 140 GBP through August 24. Members of The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group receive a 20 percent discount – members can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code.

Health and Safety
In-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and wear a mask while onsite at the event. Additionally, all attendees will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage and read our blog post.

Academic Registration Scholarships & Travel Funding
Support for Academic Scholarships and Travel Funding is provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and is intended to enable participation in OSPOCon by faculty, staff, students, and/or administrators actively engaged with or interested in learning more about Open Source Program Offices in Academic/Research institutions. To learn more and apply, click here.

Diversity & Need-Based Scholarships and Travel Funding
Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted here. The Linux Foundation’s Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. We place an emphasis on funding applicants who are from historically underrepresented or untapped groups and/or those of lower socioeconomic status. To learn more and apply, click here

Sponsor
For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team. The sponsorship deadline is September 9. 

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O’Connell.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 2,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

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Media Contact
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

The post The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group Announce the Schedule for OSPOCon Europe 2021, Oct 6 appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Edit sshd_config using a Bash script

Using Bash scripts can ensure consistency, security, and proper configuration of SSH and other services.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

How to create dynamic configuration files using Ansible templates

Ansible templates extend your ability to configure applications quickly and easily. This example uses a template to configure Vim.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

Our Back to School Sale is On!

It’s that time of year again – school is back in session. This makes it the perfect time to learn a new open source skill, and obtain the certification to demonstrate it. 

Our 2021 Open Source Jobs Report, which will be released in late September, found that demand for certified talent is skyrocketing, with 72% of technical hiring managers surveyed reporting they are more likely to hire a candidate who holds a certification, up from 52% in 2020. 

That is why we are discounting our bundled offerings, which include registration for one of our widely-respected certification exams as well as the related training course. This will give you the skills and knowledge to be successful working with a particular technology while getting you ready to take your exam. During this sale period, you only pay for the exam ($375) but you receive the training course for free. Make sure to select “Buy Bundle” from the product page, and use code FREE21 at checkout to take advantage. 

Options include:

Kubernetes Fundamentals + Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA)
Kubernetes for Developers + Certified Kubernetes Application Developer (CKAD)
Kubernetes Security Essentials + Certified Kubernetes Security Specialist (CKS)
Essentials of Linux System Administration + Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS)
Linux Networking and Administration + Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE)
Hyperledger Fabric Administration + Certified Hyperledger Fabric Administrator (CHFA)
Hyperledger Fabric for Developers + Certified Hyperledger Fabric Developer (CHFD)
Node.js Application Development + Certified OpenJS Node.js Application Developer (JSNAD)
Node.js Services Development + Certified OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD)
Cloud Foundry for Developers + Cloud Foundry Certified Developer (CFCD)
ONAP Fundamentals + Certified ONAP Professional (COP)

View full sale details

If you aren’t sure what to pursue, that’s ok! Check out our Plan Your Training page to view learning paths, or take our Career Path Quiz to figure out which area of technology best fits your interests and personality.

The post Our Back to School Sale is On! appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

Level up your Ansible skills while having fun: Sysadmin after dark

Gaming is a great way to clear your head after a long workday, and automating game installations with Ansible means you can start playing sooner.
Read More at Enable Sysadmin

How and Why to Link WebAssembly Modules

By Marco Fioretti

WebAssembly, or Wasm for brevity, is a Web-optimized executable software format, designed to give programmers the greatest possible flexibility. Wasm binary modules can be compiled once, and then safely run anywhere, alone or embedded in other applications. In practice, Wasm needs at least three key components to keep that promise. Two of them, already presented in this series, are the WebAssembly System Interface (WASI), and Wasm Interface Types.

WASI gives Wasm modules standard, language-independent ways to interact with any host environment in which they may land. The Interface Types, instead, are equally standardized definitions, but for all kinds of software variables. By using them, Wasm modules can pass complex data structures to each other without risking corrupting them, even if they were written by independent programmers in very different source languages. The other main piece of this puzzle is called module linking. This is what allows distinct binary files to interact directly – for example using each other’s functions – as if they were both written as different sections of the same source code and then compiled together.

The pros and cons of linking Wasm modules

The first reason to link Wasm modules is one that is always valid in every area of programming, which is reuse. If a library of, say, mathematical or networking functions can be written (and maintained!) once, but in a way that allows thousands of programmers to use it with little or no effort, everybody wins.

The other reason is even simpler, but particularly important for a format like Wasm: speed. At least for the foreseeable future, most Wasm modules will be downloaded by some remote server, possibly on a slow mobile link, to be executed on the fly. In all such cases, every extra second spent downloading and preparing code can make a difference. If a large Wasm application is split in separate, interlinkable modules, its host can download only the ones its own users need, and only when they actually need them. To further reduce downloads, frequently requested modules can even be cached locally.

Of course, there can be too much of a good thing. Using many modules, especially from many independent sources, speeds up software development, but can make its maintenance more complex in the long run. At the same time, on any stable network, downloading and linking several modules takes, almost by definition, more time than getting just one blob of code that does exactly the same thing. In addition, function calls between linked Wasm modules “can be slower than function calls within one module”. Overall, all these factors may lead to a real-world performance hit of a few percentage points. In many cases, this will be a very reasonable price to pay.

The Wasm way to link modules

Independently developed Wasm modules can always be “linked” in the same way used for countless software applications, which is at compile time. This produces one executable file that has all the desired features and is ready to run inside any Wasm/WASI compliant virtual machine. Besides depending on the specific languages and toolchain used to generate each executable file, however, this static linking is almost the opposite of the desired result: a “portable, host- and language-independent ecosystem” of WebAssembly modules that are composable as needed after, not before downloading them, and regardless of where they came from.

A first, if small step in this direction consists of using the already mentioned Wasm Interface Types: they can, in fact, let different Wasm modules exchange copies of their data structures, without actually sharing them but as if they were parts of the same program. This limited form of cooperation among modules is called “Shared-Nothing Linking”.

The kind of linking that is really consistent with the core Wasm philosophy, however, is the one that happens only when and where it is really needed, does not waste resources and, above all, doesn’t put unnecessary constraints on the providers of Wasm modules. The linking, that is, should happen on the host that actually needs it, but without requiring any preparation for the modules that are linked, or any application-specific customization for the programmers who wrote them.

This means that Wasm binaries should use some virtualization technique to declare and import the other modules (or parts of them) that they want to link. This mechanism, called “link-time virtualization” would eventually allow so-called “Shared-Everything Dynamic Linking”, in which all the linked modules could directly share their memory and data tables, without duplications. The low-level, gory details of this approach are described in the corresponding section of the official Explainer for linking Wasm modules linking. Here, we only mention two of the general properties, or constraints, that every “pure-Wasm” linking solution should include.

The first one is the “Principle of Least Authority”, by which every Wasm module must always expose to its host, or demand from it, only the smallest possible subset of capabilities that it needs to do its job. The other is, to put it simply, that linking modules should not make Garbage Collection in Wasm more complicated than it already is.

In practice: Emscripten, JavaScript APIs and WAPM

The most elementary tools to create and use from scratch linked Wasm modules are functions like dlopen() in C or C++ or, in JavaScript, the equivalent WebAssembly APIs. With the proper instructions, the Emscripten toolchain can add, to the glue logic that makes JavaScript virtual machines load and run Wasm code, a dynamicLibraries array that lists all the modules that should be downloaded and then linked. To study or use complete linkable modules instead, check out the official registry of the WebAssembly Package Manager (WAPM), an open source tool whose purpose is exactly to facilitate the publication and installation of such modules.

The post How and Why to Link WebAssembly Modules appeared first on Linux Foundation – Training.

Open Mainframe Project Announces the Full Schedule for the 2nd Annual Open Mainframe Summit on September 22-23

The open source mainframe virtual event features keynote speakers from DeployHub, FINOS, Jono Bacon Consulting, the Linux Foundation, ZEDEDA and more 

SAN FRANCISCO, August 12, 2021 The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, today announces the complete schedule of the 2nd annual Open Mainframe Summit. This year’s virtual event, which takes place on September 22-23, will feature keynote speakers Gabriele Columbro, Executive Director of Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS); Jason Shepherd, Vice President of Ecosystem at ZEDEDA and Chair of the LF Edge Governing Board; Jono Bacon, a leading community and collaboration speaker and founder of Jono Bacon Consulting; Steve Winslow, Vice President of Compliance and Legal at The Linux Foundation; Tracy Ragan, CEO and Co-Founder of DeployHub and Continuous Delivery Foundation Board Member, and more.

The theme of this year’s Open Mainframe Summit expands beyond the mainframe to highlight influencers with strengths in the areas supporting or leveraging the technology like continuous delivery, edge computing, financial services and open source. It will also highlight projects, diversity and business topics that will offer seasoned professionals, developers, students and leaders an opportunity to share best practices and network with like-minded individuals.

Conference Sessions highlight projects, diversity and business topics such as:

Mainframe Mavens: 5 Women to Know – Stacey Miller, Global Product Marketing Manager at SUSE and Yvette LaMar, Director of the IBM Z Influencer Ecosystem at IBMThe Facts about COBOL – Misty Decker, Product Marketing Director at Micro Focus; Derek Britton, Director of Communications and Brand Strategy at Micro Focus; and Cameron Seay, Adjunct Instructor at East Carolina UniversityMaking Our Strong Community Stronger moderated by Dr. Gloria Chance, CEO at Mousai Group -Jeanne Glass, CEO and Founder of VirtualZ Computing; David Jeffries, Vice President of Development IBM z/OS Software at IBM; Greg Lotko, Broadcom; Andy Youniss, Rocket SoftwareConsoleZ – Accessing z/VM Console Data from a Browser – Mike MacIsaac, Systems Programmer at ADPWorkflow wiZard: A Flexible Workflow Creation Tool for z/OSMF – Ray Cole, Product Architect at BMC SoftwareFeilong: The Open Source API for z/VM Automation – Mike Friesenegger, Solutions Architect at SUSEIntegrating Tessia for Self-Provisioning of Linux Distributions on Z – Alexander Efremkin, Tessia Architect, Linux Workload Enablement on IBM Z at IBMIntroducing ZEBRA – an Incubation Project for Zowe – Salisu Ali, Student at Bayero University Kano, Andrew Twydell, Intern at IBM and Alex Kim, Enterprise Solutions Architect at Vicom InfinityDIY: Zowe Explorer Starter Kit – Jessielaine Punongbayan, Product Marketing Engineer at Broadcom and Richelle Anne Craw, Senior Software Engineer at Broadcom

With a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion, Open Mainframe Project worked closely with the CHAOSS Diversity & Inclusion Badging Program, which encourages events to obtain D&I badges for leadership, self-reflection, and self-improvement on issues critical to building the Internet as a social good. Open Mainframe Summit earned a Gold Badge for prioritizing diversity and inclusion.

See the full conference schedule here. Conference Registration for the online event is $50 for general attendance and $15 for academia.

Open Mainframe Summit is made possible thanks to Platinum Sponsors Broadcom, IBM, Rocket Software and SUSE; Gold Sponsors Micro Focus and Vicom Infinity; Silver Sponsor BMC; and Academic and Community Sponsors CD Foundation and FINOS. For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here

Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Maemalynn at maemalynn@linuxfoundation.org.

About the Open Mainframe Project

The Open Mainframe Project is intended to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. With a vision of Open Source on the Mainframe as the standard for enterprise class systems and applications, the project’s mission is to build community and adoption of Open Source on the mainframe by eliminating barriers to Open Source adoption on the mainframe, demonstrating value of the mainframe on technical and business levels, and strengthening collaboration points and resources for the community to thrive. Learn more about the project at https://www.openmainframeproject.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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The post Open Mainframe Project Announces the Full Schedule for the 2nd Annual Open Mainframe Summit on September 22-23 appeared first on Linux Foundation.