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Linux Mint 20 is 64-bit only, based on Ubuntu 20.04, and named ‘Ulyana’

Linux Mint is great operating system. It is based on the excellent Ubuntu and features three great desktop environment options — Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce. While it is a smart choice for Linux beginners, it is also good for experts too.

Today, we learn some new details about the upcoming Linux Mint 20. While most of the newly revealed information is positive, there is one thing that is sure to upset many Linux Mint users.

First things first, Linux Mint 20 will be based on the upcoming Ubuntu 20.04. This shouldn’t come as a surprise, as Mint only uses Long Term Support versions of Ubuntu, and 20.04 will be an LTS. We also now know the name of Linux Mint 20. The Mint team always uses female names, and this time they chose “Ulyana.” This is apparently a Russian name meaning “youthful.”

[Source: BetaNews]

Oracle Ships Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 6

Oracle has announced their newest major release of their “Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel” that they continue spinning as an option for users of Oracle Linux and being the default within the Oracle Cloud. Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 6 shifts their code-base from tracking the Linux 4.14 LTS kernel to now being on the Linux 5.4 LTS branch. That big version jump alone is significant with all of the new upstream features introduced since Linux 4.14’s debut in November 2017.

Oracle is also promoting Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 6 as having better 64-bit Arm (AArch64) support, Cgroups v2 is more mature, KTask for parallelizing CPU-intensive work, parallelizing KSwapd, Kexec firmware signing, better memory management, the latest DTrace support and now implemented using BPF, support for the OCFS2 file-system, and Btrfs support.

[Source: Phoronix]

Eclipse Foundation offers open-source alternative to Visual Studio Code

The Eclipse Foundation just released version 1.0 of an open-source alternative to Visual Studio Code called Eclipse Theia. Theia is an extensible platform that allows developers to create multi-language cloud and desktop IDEs, allowing them to create entirely new developer experiences.

According to the Eclipse Foundation, the differences between Theia and Visual Studio Code are that Theia has a more modular architecture, Theia was designed from the ground to run on desktop and cloud, and Theia was developed under community-driven and vendor-neutral governance of the Eclipse Foundation.

[Source: SDTimes.com]

Tech Giants Team Up to Launch Open Source 5G Infrastructure Management Tool

HPE and Intel are working with open source partners such as Red Hat to create a 5G distributed infrastructure management tool that could potentially help telecommunications firms get past the difficulty of installing 5G system into sites that hold infrastructure belonging to multiple vendors. The project will be donated to the Linux Foundation, with release scheduled for later in Q2 2020. It will be accessible via: www.linuxfoundation.org.

HPE’s Open Distributed Infrastructure Management (ODIM) initiative aims to create this standard and simplify the management of large scale distributed physical hardware deployments. Working with Intel and supported by industry players such as AMI, Apstra, Red Hat, Tech Mahindra and World Wide Technology to create infrastructure management code that will be provided as open source to the tech community.

[Source: Computer Business Review]

Up To 500 Linux Foundation Training Scholarships To Be Awarded

Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) Scholarships are back! Since 2011, The Linux Foundation has awarded over 100 scholarships for more than $220,000 in training and certification to deserving individuals around the world who would otherwise be unable to afford it. This year the foundation is giving out 500 scholarships to help aspiring open source professionals.

[Source: Linux Foundation Training]

How open-source must navigate success and conflict to survive

At the Open Source Summit in San Diego last summer, a representative from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation enthusiastically declared that open-source was entering its “golden age.” This raises two questions: What will that “golden age” look like, and how will open-source deal with its success? The evidence for open-source popularity is hard to dispute. Whether it’s the purchase of Red Hat Inc. by IBM Corp. for $34 billion in 2018 or surveys that show that at least 85% of businesses are using open-source software in some form, open-source has entered the mainstream enterprise world.

However, success can also breed conflict with existing business models. In the electrical world, this clash is often called “impedance,” a measure of the opposition to the flow of alternating current through a circuit. For one prominent member of the open-source community, handling “impedance” in the form of conflict between legacy infrastructure and new technologies will be a key part of the open-source future.

[Source: SiliconANGLE]

Debian Linux readies an anti-coronavirus hack-a-thon

Open-source programmers and engineers have been working on a wide variety of projects to beat coronavirus. These range from hospital management programs to speeding up drug development to building inexpensive ventilators. Now, Debian Linux, one of the oldest and largest Linux distribution communities, is throwing its programming resources behind a hack-a-thon trying to beat COVID-19.

The Debian Med team is inviting programmers to a virtual COVID-19 Biohackathon from April 5-11, 2020. The Debian Med team wants your help in improving free and open-source biomedical software programs, tools and libraries.

[Source: ZDNet]

Huawei open-sources MindSpore, a framework for AI app development

Huawei this week announced that MindSpore, a framework for AI app development the company detailed in August 2019, is now available in open source on GitHub and Gitee. The lightweight suite is akin to Google’s TensorFlow and Facebook’s PyTorch, and it scales across devices, edge, and cloud environments, ostensibly lowering the barrier to entry for developers looking to imbue apps with AI.

MindSpore, which has the backing of partners like the University of Edinburgh, Peking University, Imperial College London, and robotics startup Milvus, runs atop processors, graphics cards, and dedicated neural processing units like those in Huawei’s Ascend AI chips.

[Source: VentureBeat]

GitLab is open sourcing 18 features for the DevOps lifecycle

The DevOps tool GitLab offers paid and free versions, and now 18 additional features will be moved to the open source editions Core/Free. The developer community can contribute to the according issues and speed up the process—so now is the time to take a look and see which of the features you find most important.

Sid Sijbrandij, co-founder and CEO of GitLab Inc., has announced that 18 Gitlab features will move to the open source editions Core/Free.

So, let’s see what new features await open source users.

[Source: JAXenter]

DataStax launches Kubernetes operator for open source Cassandra database

Today, DataStax, the commercial company behind the open source Apache Cassandra project, announced an open source Kubernetes operator developed by the company to run a cloud native version of the database. When Sam Ramji, chief strategy officer at DataStax, came over from Google last year, the first thing he did was take the pulse of customers, partners and community members around Kubernetes and Cassandra, and they found there was surprisingly limited support.

While some companies had built Kubernetes support themselves, DataStax lacked one to call its own. Given that Kubernetes was born inside Google, and the company has widely embraced the notion of containerization in general, Ramji wanted there to be an operator specifically designed by the company to give customers a general starting point with Kubernetes.

[Source: TechCrunch]