Tags: Enthusiast

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GNOME Unity
Jack Wallen looks at the similarities and differences between Unity and GNOME to help Unity users effortlessly make the transition.

Getting to Know GNOME (From a Unity Perspective)

Unless you’ve lost all network connections over the past couple of weeks, you know the big news: Canonical announced it was dropping Ubuntu Unity and returning to its GNOME roots. Whether you think this is good or bad news, it’s happening. When the official Ubuntu 18.04 is released, it will be all...
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Ubuntu 17.04: The Bittersweet Linux Release

It's been a heck of a month for Canonical, Ubuntu Linux's parent company. The company dropped its smartphone and tablet plans. This, in turn, ended to its plans to make Unity its universal default interface. Instead, Gnome will become Ubuntu's once and future desktop. Days later, long-time CEO Jane...
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A 1986 Bulletin Board System Has Brought the Old Web Back to Life in 2017

Today, many can be forgiven for thinking that the digital communications revolution kicked off during the mid-1990s, when there was simply an explosion of media and consumer interest in the World Wide Web. Just a decade earlier, however, the future was now for the hundreds of thousands of users...
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BeagleBone Blue
The BeagleBone Blue is a robotics-focused collaboration with the University of California San Diego Robotics Lab, which is using the board for robotics education.

Latest Linux Maker Boards Gamble on Diversity

As usual, last week’s Embedded World show in Nuremberg, Germany was primarily focused on commercial embedded single board computers (SBCs), computer-on-modules, and rugged industrial systems for the OEM market. Yet, we also saw a growing number of community-backed maker boards, which, like most of...
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How to Deploy Kubernetes on the Raspberry Pi

When I became interested in ARM devices, and in the Raspberry Pi in particular, my first project was an OpenVPN server. By having the Raspberry Pi as a secure gateway to my home network, I could use my phone to control my desktop and remotely play Spotify, open documents, and a bunch of other fun...
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SparkFun blocks
SparkFun Blocks let you quickly add functionality to your Intel Edison board.

Interact with the Intel Edison Using SparkFun Blocks

In the previous article, I looked at the Intel Edison -- how fast it was, and how much power it needed. This time, I will show how to start getting the Edison board to interact with surrounding electronics with the help of SparkFun Blocks (Figure 1). edison-blocks2.jpg Figure 1:...
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Intel Edison
The tiny Intel Edison begs to be the brain of your next electronics tinkering project.

The Intel Edison: Linux Maker Machine in a Matchbox

The Intel Edison is a physically tiny computer that draws a small amount of power and breaks out plenty of connections to allow it to interact with other electronics. It begs to be the brain of your next electronics tinkering project, with all the basics in a tiny package and an easy way to connect...
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The Physical Computing Capabilities of the Raspberry Pi

While the Raspberry Pi is an excellent and affordable mini Linux computer with a stylish and functional desktop user interface, it has plenty of scope beyond that of a regular PC. Here's an overview of the physical computing capabilities of the Pi. GPIO pins Since 2014, with the release of the...
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10 (Mostly) Easy Linux Distros for Newbies

A fresh look at some of the more popular Linux distros (plus one non-Linux OS), and an impression of their ease of use. Linux has a bad rap as a daily driver – the programs aren’t written to run on Linux, it’s tricky to install stuff, and so on. But it might surprise people who think along those...
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Mike Anderson
Mike Anderson takes you step-by-step through the process of using a Raspberry Pi to register with Amazon Voice Services in this presentation from Embedded Linux Conference.

How to Turn Your Raspberry Pi Into a Voice-Enabled Amazon Alexa Device

One of the leading items on embedded developers’ to-do lists these days is to add Amazon’s Alexa voice agent to a hacker board or another Linux device. Of course, you could simply buy an Alexa-enabled Amazon Echo speaker system for $180 -- or a non-speaker Amazon Echo Dot for only $50 -- but what...
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