Tags: filesystem

Shared Storage with NFS and SSHFS

Up to this point, my series on HPC fundamentals has covered PDSH, to run commands in parallel across the nodes of a cluster, and Lmod, to allow users to manage their environment so they can specify various versions of compilers, libraries, and tools for building and executing applications. One...
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Working with Linux File Links

In this article by Oliver Pelz, the author of Fundamentals of Linux, you’ll take a look at what Linux file links are and how to work with them. Connecting a filename to the actual data is managed by the filesystem using a table or data structure, which is called a title allocation table. In the...
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moving files
Paul Brown continues his Linux filesystem series with a look at moving, copying, renaming, and more.

Linux for Beginners: Moving Things Around

In previous installments of this series, you learned about directories and how permissions to access directories work. Most of what you learned in those articles can be applied to files, except how to make a file executable. So let's deal with that before moving on. No .exe Needed In other...
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systemd
This installment of our systemd series covers how to create a unit that starts a service when something changes in the filesystem.

Systemd Services: Monitoring Files and Directories

So far in this systemd multi-part tutorial, we’ve covered how to start and stop a service by hand, how to start a service when booting your OS and have it stop on power down, and how to boot a service when a certain device is detected. This installment does something different yet again and covers...
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filesystem
We continue our look at the tree-like structure of the Linux filesystem and show how to create directories of your own.

Manipulating Directories in Linux

If you are new to this series (and to Linux), take a look at our first installment. In that article, we worked our way through the tree-like structure of the Linux filesystem, or more precisely, the File Hierarchy Standard. I recommend reading through it to make sure you understand what you can and...
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filesystem
This tutorial will help you get up to speed on the Linux filesystem.

The Linux Filesystem Explained

Back in 1996 I learned how to install software on my spanking new Linux before really understanding the topography of the filesystem. This turned out to be a problem, not so much for programs, because they would just magically work even though I hadn't a clue of where the actual executable files...
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Understanding Linux filesystems: ext4 and Beyond

The majority of modern Linux distributions default to the ext4 filesystem, just as previous Linux distributions defaulted to ext3, ext2, and—if you go back far enough—ext. If you're new to Linux—or to filesystems—you might wonder what ext4 brings to the table that ext3 didn't. You might also wonder...
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locate
We finish up this short series with a look at the amazing simplicity of the locate command in daily use.

Finding Files with mlocate: Part 3

In the previous articles in this short series, we introduced the mlocate (or just locate) command, and then discussed some ways the updatedb tool can be used to help you find that one particular file in a thousand. You are probably also aware of xargs as well as the find command. Our trusty friend...
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GoboLinux
Jack Wallen looks at GoboLinux, which takes a whole new approach to the Linux filesystem.

GoboLinux Redefines the Linux Filesystem Hierarchy

One complaint some new users have is that the Linux filesystem hierarchy is confusing. After all, why are program executables stored in /usr/bin and what is home? For those who are accustomed to Linux, this all makes some strange form of sense. However, if you take a moment to step back and really...
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symbolic links
Within Linux, there’s more to links than just creating a shortcut to another location. Jack Wallen has details.

Understanding Linux Links

Linux is, without a doubt, one of the single most flexible operating system platforms on the planet. With the flagship open source ecosystem, there is almost nothing you cannot do. What makes Linux so flexible? The answer to that question will depend on your needs. Suffice it to say, the list of...
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